Understanding Asthma Pathophysiology

Author: Fireman, Philip

Source: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, Volume 24, Number 2, March-April 2003 , pp. 79-83(5)

Publisher: OceanSide Publications, Inc

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Abstract:

Asthma is best described as a chronic disease that involves inflammation of the pulmonary airways and bronchial hyperresponsiveness that results in the clinical expression of a lower airway obstruction that usually is reversible. Physiologically, bronchial hyperresponsiveness is documented by decreased bronchial airflow after bronchoprovocation with methacholine or histamine. Other triggers that provoke airway obstruction include cold air, exercise, viral upper respiratory infection, cigarette smoke, and respiratory allergens. Bronchial provocation with allergen induces a prompt early phase immunoglobulin E (IgE)- mediated decrease in bronchial airflow (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) followed in many patients by a late-phase IgEmediated reaction with a decrease in bronchial airflow for 4-8 hours. The gross pathology of asthmatic airways displays lung hyperinflation, smooth muscle hypertrophy, lamina reticularis thickening, mucosal edema, epithelial cell sloughing, cilia cell disruption, and mucus gland hypersecretion. Microscopically, asthma is characterized by the presence of increased numbers of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and plasma cells in the bronchial tissues, bronchial secretions, and mucus. Initially, there is recruitment of leukocytes from the bloodstream to the airway by activated CD4 T-lymphocytes. The activated T-lymphocytes also direct the release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. In addition, the subclass 2 helper T-lymphocytes subset of activated T-lymphocytes produces interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13. IL-4 in conjunction with IL-13 signals the switch from IgM to IgE antibodies. The cross-linkage of two IgE molecules by allergen causes mast cells to degranulate, releasing histamine, leukotrienes, and other mediators that perpetuate the airway inflammation. IL-5 activates the recruitment and activation of eosinophils. The activated mast cells and eosinophils also generate their cytokines that help to perpetuate the inflammation. Regardless of the triggers of asthma, the repeated cycles of inflammation in the lungs with injury to the pulmonary tissues followed by repair may produce long-term structural changes ("remodeling") of the airways. This review will discuss in greater detail the relationships of inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness to the pathophysiology of asthma.

Document Type: Regular Paper

Publication date: March 1, 2003

More about this publication?
  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. Its primary readership consists of allergists and pulmonologists.

    The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma.

    Featured topics include asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, food allergies, allergic skin diseases, diagnostic techniques, allergens, and treatment modalities. Published material includes peer-reviewed original research, clinical trials and review articles.

    Articles marked "F" offer free full text for personal noncommercial use only.

    The journal is indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Science Citation Index Expanded, plus the National Library of Medicine's PubMed service.
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