Skip to main content

Habitat alteration by geese at a large arctic goose colony: consequences for lemmings and voles

Buy Article:

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Heavy grazing by Ross’s geese (Chen rossi (Cassin, 1861)) and lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens (L., 1758)) has resulted in substantial habitat alteration in some parts of the Arctic. However, the influence of these habitat alterations on other animals is poorly understood. We therefore examined how habitat alteration by geese influenced small-mammal (lemmings and voles) abundance at the large goose colony near Karrak Lake, Nunavut, by comparing small-mammal abundance and aboveground biomass of plants inside and outside the colony. Heavy grazing by geese resulted in virtually complete removal of graminoid plants (grasses and sedges) in lowland areas in the colony, which in turn was associated with a reduction in small-mammal abundance of about one order of magnitude compared with that in lowland areas outside the colony. Aboveground biomass of plants in upland areas in the colony was also reduced compared with that in upland areas outside the colony, although this reduction was less pronounced than that in lowland areas in the colony. Moreover, this reduction was not associated with a reduction in small-mammal abundance. There was, thus, a strong negative correlation between habitat alteration by geese and distribution and abundance of small mammals at this colony.

Le broutage intensif par les oies de Ross (Chen rossi (Cassin, 1861)) et les petites oies des neiges (Chen caerulescens (L., 1758)) a produit des modifications substantielles de l’habitat dans certaines régions de l’Arctique. On comprend, cependant, assez mal l’influence de ces modifications de l’habitat sur les autres animaux. C’est pourquoi nous avons examiné l’influence des modifications de l’habitat par les oies sur l’abondance des petits mammifères (lemmings et campagnols) à la grande colonie d’oies près du lac Karrak, Nunavut, en comparant l’abondance des petits mammifères et la biomasse aérienne des plantes à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de la colonie. Le broutage intensif des oies a entraîné l’élimination presque complète des plantes graminoïdes (graminées et laîches) dans les terres basses de la colonie, qui, à son tour, est associée à une réduction de l’abondance des petits mammifères par un facteur d’environ 10 par comparaison avec leur abondance dans les terres basses hors de la colonie. La biomasse aérienne des plantes dans les terres hautes dans la colonie a aussi été réduite par rapport à celle trouvée dans les terres hautes à l’extérieur de la colonie, bien que cette réduction soit moins prononcée que dans la région des terres basses de la colonie. De plus, cette réduction ne s’accompagne pas d’une réduction de l’abondance des petits mammifères. Il y a, ainsi, une forte corrélation négative entre la modification de l’habitat par les oies et la répartition et l’abondance des petits mammifères dans cette colonie.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2009-01-01

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1929, this monthly journal reports on primary research contributed by respected international scientists in the broad field of zoology, including behaviour, biochemistry and physiology, developmental biology, ecology, genetics, morphology and ultrastructure, parasitology and pathology, and systematics and evolution. It also invites experts to submit review articles on topics of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free ContentFree content
  • Partial Free ContentPartial Free content
  • New ContentNew content
  • Open Access ContentOpen access content
  • Partial Open Access ContentPartial Open access content
  • Subscribed ContentSubscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed ContentPartial Subscribed content
  • Free Trial ContentFree trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more