Skip to main content

Seasonal and yearly changes in consumption of hypogeous fungi by northern flying squirrels and red squirrels in old-growth forest, New Brunswick

Buy Article:

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Seasonal consumption of mycorrhizal fungus by northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) and red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) was examined in old-growth mixedwood forest at Fundy National Park in southern New Brunswick between May 1999 and March 2001. Using faecal pellet analysis, we found that the amount of fungus in the diet of both species was dependent on season and year of study and ranged from 35% to 95%. Twenty fungal taxa, most of them hypogeous Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes, were detected in diets. More taxa were detected in summer diets compared with all other seasons, but all seasonal samples contained several hypogeous taxa. Up to six taxa were identified in any one sample. Both squirrel species occurred at high densities throughout the study, and dietary overlap between them was great throughout this time in terms of both the amount of fungus and the proportions of different taxa that were consumed. Overall, our data suggest that both G. sabrinus and T. hudsonicus are abundant and important consumers of fungus in the region and that fungus may represent a key food resource, particularly during times when other foods are limited.

Nous avons évalué la consommation de mycorhizes de champignons par les grands polatouches (Glaucomys sabrinus) et les écureuils roux (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) dans une forêt mixte à maturité dans le parc national de Fundy dans le sud du Nouveau-Brunswick de mai 1999 à mars 2001. L'analyse des boulettes fécales a révélé que l'importance des champignons dans le régime alimentaire chez ces deux espèces dépend de la saison et de l'année d'étude et qu'elle varie de 35 % à 95 %. Vingt taxons de champignons, surtout des ascomycètes et des basidiomycètes hypogées, peuvent y être reconnus. Il y a plus de taxons dans le régime alimentaire en été qu'aux autres saisons, mais les échantillons de toutes les saisons contiennent toujours plusieurs taxons hypogées. On trouve jusqu'à six taxons dans un même échantillon. Les densités des deux espèces d'écureuils étaient élevées durant toute notre étude et le recoupement entre leurs régimes alimentaires était important pendant toute la période, tant en quantité de champignons consommés qu'en proportions de taxons utilisés. En somme, nos résultats démontrent que G. sabrinus et T. hudsonicus sont, tous deux, des consommateurs abondants et importants de champignons dans la région et que les champignons peuvent représenter une source significative de nourriture, particulièrement durant les périodes où les autres sources de nourriture sont rares.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2004-01-01

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1929, this monthly journal reports on primary research contributed by respected international scientists in the broad field of zoology, including behaviour, biochemistry and physiology, developmental biology, ecology, genetics, morphology and ultrastructure, parasitology and pathology, and systematics and evolution. It also invites experts to submit review articles on topics of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free ContentFree content
  • Partial Free ContentPartial Free content
  • New ContentNew content
  • Open Access ContentOpen access content
  • Partial Open Access ContentPartial Open access content
  • Subscribed ContentSubscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed ContentPartial Subscribed content
  • Free Trial ContentFree trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more