Effect of landscape structure on the movement behaviour of a specialized goldenrod beetle, Trirhabda borealis

Authors: Goodwin, B.J.; Fahrig, L.

Source: Canadian Journal of Zoology, Volume 80, Number 1, January 2002 , pp. 24-35(12)

Publisher: NRC Research Press

Buy & download fulltext article:

OR

Price: $50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

We hypothesize that the ability of an organism to move through a landscape is determined by the interaction between its movement behaviour and the landscape structure. In contrast, models predicting spatial distribution, local population stability, or metapopulation stability typically assume that movement ability is independent of landscape structure. These model predictions will be invalid if the assumption of constant movement ability is incorrect. To assess the influence of landscape structure on movement behaviour (and therefore movement ability), we tracked individual goldenrod beetles (Trirhabda borealis) through microlandscapes composed of three patch types (goldenrod, cut vegetation, and cut vegetation containing camouflage netting to a height of 50 cm) that differed in terms of available food resources and structural complexity. In goldenrod patches, beetles moved infrequently in brief bursts of slow meandering movements. In cut patches, beetles moved frequently in sustained bursts of slow directed movements. In netting patches, beetles moved frequently in brief bursts of fast meandering movements. Using mark-release experiments, we determined that T. borealis did not detect goldenrod from afar or respond to edge type. Since T. borealis movement behaviour differed between patch types, its movement ability must depend on landscape structure. If this general result applies to other species, it implies that predictions of local population and metapopulation responses to landscape alteration could be erroneous. Effects of landscape alteration on movement behaviour should be incorporated into models of population response to landscape alteration.

Nous posons en hypothèse que la capacité d'un organisme de se déplacer dans un paysage est déterminée par l'interaction entre son comportement de déplacement et la structure du paysage. En revanche, les modèles qui prédisent la répartition dans l'espace, la stabilité des populations locales ou de la métapopulation assument ordinairement au départ que la capacité à se déplacer est indépendante de la structure du paysage. Les prédictions de ces modèles seront invalides si la capacité constante de se déplacer ne se réalise pas. Pour évaluer l'influence de la structure du paysage sur le comportement de déplacement (et, par conséquent, la capacité de se déplacer), nous avons suivi des coléoptères Trirhabda borealis dans des micro-paysages composés de trois types de parcelles de végétation (verge d'or, végétation coupée, végétation coupée contenant du grillage de camouflage jusqu'à 50 cm de hauteur), différant par leurs ressources alimentaires et par la complexité de leur structure. Dans les parcelles de verges d'or, les coléoptères se déplacent rarement, par séquences brèves de mouvements lents et sinueux. Dans les parcelles ou la végétation a été coupée, les insectes se déplacent fréquemment, par séquences brèves de mouvements lents et dirigés. Dans les parcelles avec grillage, les coléoptères se déplacent souvent, par séquences brèves de mouvements rapides et sinueux. Les expériences de marquage-lâchage indiquent que T. borealis ne détecte pas la verge d'or de loin et ne réagit pas au type de bordure. Puisque le comportement de déplacement de T. borealis diffère d'une parcelle à l'autre, sa capacité de déplacement doit donc dépendre de la structure du paysage. Si ce résultat général s'applique à d'autres espèces, cela veut dire que, dans les populations locales et dans la métapopulation, les prédictions des réactions à des modifications du paysage peuvent être erronées. Les effets de modifications du paysage sur le comportement de déplacement doivent donc être intégrés aux modèles de réactions des populations aux modifications du paysage.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: January 1, 2002

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1929, this monthly journal reports on primary research contributed by respected international scientists in the broad field of zoology, including behaviour, biochemistry and physiology, developmental biology, ecology, genetics, morphology and ultrastructure, parasitology and pathology, and systematics and evolution. It also invites experts to submit review articles on topics of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content

Text size:

A | A | A | A
Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. print icon Print this page