Skip to main content

The effect of activity during early postnatal development on motor unit size

Buy Article:

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

At early stages of neuromuscular development, motor unit territory is expanded, with each muscle fibre being supplied by several axons. During postnatal development, some synapses are eliminated, motor unit size decreases, and the adult distribution of motor unit sizes emerges. This process depends on activity, since it proceeds more rapidly when the nerve is activated and is slower when activity is reduced. Here we studied whether, in addition to influencing the rate of retraction of motor unit territory, activity during the critical period of development affects the final outcome of the distribution of motor unit sizes. The sciatic nerve of 8- to 12-day-old rats was stimulated daily. One week later the tension of the extensor digitorum longus muscle and that of its individual motor units was recorded. The sizes of individual motor units were calculated and compared with those from animals that received no stimulation. The distribution of motor unit sizes from stimulated muscles was not significantly different from those from control muscles. Therefore, we conclude that although activity increases the rate at which motor units attain their adult size, it does not influence the final outcome of motor unit size distribution.Key words: motor unit, electrical stimulation, postnatal development, polyneuronal elimination.

Aux premiers stades du développement neuromusculaire, le territoire des unités motrices s'étend, chacune des fibres musculaires étant innervée par plusieurs axones. Au cours du développement postnatal, certains synapses sont éliminés, la taille des unités motrices décroît et la distribution de la taille des unités motrices de l'adulte émerge. Ce processus dépend de l'activité, puisqu'il a lieu plus vite lorsque le nerf est activé et moins rapidement quand l'activité est réduite. Nous avons étudié ici la question de savoir si, outre qu'elle influence le rythme de la rétraction du territoire des unités motrices, l'activité pendant la période cruciale du développement a une incidence sur le résultat final de la distribution de la taille des unités motrices. Le nerf sciatique de rats âgés de 8 à 12 jours a été stimulé quotidiennement. Une semaine plus tard, la tension du muscle extenseur digitorum longus et celle de ses unités motrices ont été consignées. La taille de chacune des unités motrices a été calculée et comparée à celle d'animaux n'ayant reçu aucune stimulation. La distribution de la taille des unités motrices des muscles stimulés ne différait pas de façon significative de celle des muscles du groupe témoin. Nous concluons par conséquent que, bien que l'activité fasse augmenter le rythme auquel les unités motrices atteignent leur taille adulte, elle n'influence pas le résultat final de la distribution de la taille des unités motrices.Mots clés : unité motrice, stimulation électrique, développement postnatal, élimination polyneuronale.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2004-07-01

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1929, this monthly journal reports current research in all aspects of physiology, nutrition, pharmacology, and toxicology, contributed by recognized experts and scientists. It publishes symposium reviews and award lectures and occasionally dedicates entire issues or portions of issues to subjects of special interest to its international readership.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more