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Characterization of an endophytic whorl-forming Streptomyces from Catharanthus roseus stems producing polyene macrolide antibiotic

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Abstract:

An endophytic whorl-forming Streptomyces sp. designated as TS3RO having antifungal activity against a large number of fungal pathogens, including Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Rhizoctonia solani, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Cryphonectria parasitica, Fusarium oxysporum, Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, Epidermophyton floccosum, and Trichophyton rubrum, was isolated from surface-sterilized Catharanthus roseus stems. Preliminary identification showed that Streptomyces cinnamoneus subsp. sparsus was its closest related species. However, strain TS3RO could readily be distinguished from this species using a combination of phenotypic properties, 16S rDNA sequence similarity, and phylogenetic analyses. Thus, the whorl-forming Streptomyces sp. strain TS3RO is likely a new subspecies within the Streptomyces cinnamoneus group. Direct bioautography on a thin-layer chromatography plate with Cladosporium cucumerinum was conducted throughout the purification steps for bioassay-guided isolation of the active antifungal compounds from the crude extract. Structural elucidation of the isolated bioactive compound was obtained via LC–MS spectrometry, UV-visible spectra, and nuclear magnetic resonance data. It revealed that fungichromin, a known methylpentaene macrolide antibiotic, was the main antifungal component of TS3RO strain, as shown by thin-layer chromatography bioautography. This is the first report of an endophytic whorl-forming Streptomyces isolated from the medically important plant Catharanthus roseus.

Keywords: Catharanthus roseus; Streptomyces; antifongique; antifungal; endophyte; macrolides polyènes; polyene macrolides

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/w2012-034

Affiliations: 1: Laboratoire de microbiologie et de standardisation des médicaments, Institut malgache de recherches appliquées, B.P. 3833, Avarabohitra, Antananarivo, Madagascar. 2: Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, avenue E. Mounier 72, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgium 3: Université catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute, Mycology, Mycothèque de l’Université catholique de Louvain (MUCL*1), place Croix du Sud 2 bte L7.05.06, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. 4: Laboratoire de biotechnologie végétale, Université libre de Bruxelles, rue Adrienne Bolland 8, 6041 Gosselies, Belgium. 5: Unité de Chimie organique et médicinale, Université catholique de Louvain, Bâtiment Lavoisier, place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. 6: Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Earth and Life Institute, Mycology, place Croix du Sud 2 bte L7.05.06, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

Publication date: May 16, 2012

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  • Published since 1954, this monthly journal contains new research in the field of microbiology including applied microbiology and biotechnology; microbial structure and function; fungi and other eucaryotic protists; infection and immunity; microbial ecology; physiology, metabolism and enzymology; and virology, genetics, and molecular biology. It also publishes review articles and notes on an occasional basis, contributed by recognized scientists worldwide.
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