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Occurrence and dominance of yeast species in naturally fermented milk from the Tibetan Plateau of China

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Abstract:

To determine which yeasts are present in the naturally fermented milks of China, 69 samples made by the nomads of Tibet were collected from the Tibetan Plateau in China. From these samples, 225 strains of yeast were isolated and identified using conventional microbiological analysis and gene sequencing analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA. The results showed that the total concentration of yeasts in these samples ranged from 5.01 to 8.97 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL (6.91 ± 1.02 log10 CFU/mL; mean ± SD). The number of cultivable yeasts was higher in the samples from Qinghai (7.55 ± 0.75 log10 CFU/mL) than those from Tibet (6.21 ± 0.79 log10 CFU/mL, P < 0.05). Moreover, there were 15 phylotypes in these 69 samples. Among these phylotypes, Kluyveromyces marxianus (49.3%, frequency percentage), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (62.3%), and Pichia fermentans (46.4%) appeared frequently and can be considered the most common culturable species in naturally fermented milk products. Traditional fermented Mongolian cow milk featured a wide diversity of yeast species, including Issatchenkia orientalis, Kazachstania unisporus, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida pararugosa, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Geotrichum sp., Kazachstania unisporus, Geotrichum fragrans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Trichosporon gracile, and Pichia membranifaciens. This study provides new data on yeast composition in naturally fermented milk and shows the yeast biodiversity of fermented milk products from the Tibetan Plateau of China.

Afin de caractériser la population de levures présentes dans le lait naturellement fermenté en Chine, 69 échantillons préparés par les nomades du Tibet ont été recueillis dans le Plateau tibétain de Chine. Parmi ces échantillons, 225 souches de levures ont été isolées et identifiées à l’aide d’analyses microbiologiques conventionnelles et par l’analyse de la séquence du domaine D1/D2 de la grosse sous-unité (26S) du gène de l’ADN ribosomique. Les résultats ont montré que la concentration totale de levures dans ces échantillons variaient de 5,01 à 8,97 log10 unités formant colonie (UFC)/mL (6,91 ± 1,02 log10 UFC/mL; moyenne ± É.-T.). Le nombre de levures cultivables était plus élevé dans les échantillons provenant de Qinghai (7,55 ± 0,75 log10 UFC/mL) que dans ceux provenant du Tibet (6,21 ± 0,79 log10 UFC/mL, P < 0,05). De plus, 15 phylotypes ont été identifiés dans ces 69 échantillons. Parmi ces phylotypes, Kluyveromyces marxianus (pourcentage de fréquence = 49,3 %), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (62,3 %) et Pichia fermentans (46,4 %) apparaissaient fréquemment et pouvaient être considérés comme les espèces les plus communément cultivables dans les produits du lait fermenté naturellement. Le lait de vache traditionnellement fermenté en Mongolie se caractérise par une grande diversité d’espèces de levures, notamment Issatchenkia orientalis, Kazachstania unisporus, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida pararugosa, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Geotrichum sp., Kazachstania unisporus, Geotrichum fragrans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Trichosporon gracile et Pichia membranifaciens. Cette étude fournit de nouvelles données sur la composition en levures du lait naturellement fermenté, et montre la biodiversité des levures des produits de lait fermenté dans le Plateau tibétain de Chine.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2010-09-01

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  • Published since 1954, this monthly journal contains new research in the field of microbiology including applied microbiology and biotechnology; microbial structure and function; fungi and other eucaryotic protists; infection and immunity; microbial ecology; physiology, metabolism and enzymology; and virology, genetics, and molecular biology. It also publishes review articles and notes on an occasional basis, contributed by recognized scientists worldwide.
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