Evidence for mitochondrial gene control of mating types in Phytophthora

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

When protoplasts carrying metalaxyl-resistant (Mr) nuclei from the A1 isolate of Phytophthora parasitica were fused with protoplasts carrying chloroneb-resistant (Cnr) nuclei from the A2 isolate of the same species, fusion products carrying Mr nuclei were either the A2 or A1A2 type, while those carrying Cnr nuclei were the A1, A2, or A1A2 type. Fusion products carrying Mr and Cnr nuclei also behaved as the A1, A2, or A1A2 type. The result refutes the hypothesis that mating types in Phytophthora are controlled by nuclear genes. When nuclei from the A1 isolate of P. parasitica were fused with protoplasts from the A2 isolate of the same species and vice versa, all of the nuclear hybrids expressed the mating type characteristics of the protoplast parent. The same was true when the nuclei from the A1 isolate of P. parasitica were fused with the protoplasts from the A0 isolate of Phytophthora capsici and vice versa. These results confirm the observation that mating type genes are not located in the nuclei and suggest the presence of mating type genes in the cytoplasms of the recipient protoplasts. When mitochondria from the A1 isolate of P. parasitica were fused with protoplasts from the A2 isolate of the same species, the mating type of three out of five regenerated protoplasts was changed to the A1 type. The result demonstrated the decisive effect of mitochondrial donor sexuality on mating type characteristics of mitochondrial hybrids and suggested the presence of mating type genes in mitochondria. All of the mitochondrial hybrids resulting from the transfer of mitochondria from the A0 isolate of P. capsici into protoplasts from the A1 isolate of P. parasitica were all of the A0 type. The result supports the hypothesis of the presence of mating type genes in mitochondria in Phytophthora.Key words: mating type, mitochondrial gene, Phytophthora parasitica, Phytophthora capsici.

Lorsque des protoplastes renfermant des noyaux résistants au métalaxyle (Mr) de l'isolat A1 de Phytophthora parasitica ont été fusionnés à des protoplastes renfermant des noyaux résistants au chloroneb (Cnr) de l'isolat A2 de la même espèce, les produits de fusion renfermant un noyau Mr étaient soit de type A2 ou A1A2, alors que ceux renfermant un noyau Cnr étaient de type A1, A2 ou A1A2. Ce résultat réfute l'hypothèse que les types sexuels chez Phytophthora sont contrôlés par des gènes nucléaires. Lorsque les noyaux de l'isolat A1 de P. parasitica ont été fusionnés avec des protoplastes de l'isolat A2 de la même espèce et vice versa, tous les hybrides nucléaires ont exprimé les caractéristiques du type sexuel du protoplaste parent. Il en fut de même lorsqu'elle les noyaux de l'isolat A1 de P. parasitica furent fusionnés avec des protoplastes de l'isolat A0 de Phytophthora capsici et vice versa. Ces résultats confirment l'observation que les gènes de type sexuel ne se retrouvent pas dans le noyau et signale la présence de gènes de type sexuel dans les cytoplasmes des protoplastes receveurs. Lorsque les mitochondries de l'isolat A1 de P. parasitica ont été fusionnées avec des protoplastes de l'isolat A2 de la même espèce, le type sexuel de trois protoplastes régénérés sur cinq a été changé au type A1. Les résultats ont démontré un effet décisif de la sexualité du donneur mitochondrial sur les caractéristiques de type sexuel des hybrides mitochondriaux et ont signalé la présence de gènes de type sexuel dans la mitochondrie. Tous les hybrides mitochondriaux engendrés par le transfert de mitochondries de l'isolat A0 de P. capsici d'un des protoplastes de l'isolat A1 de P. parasitica étaient de type A0. Les résultats étayent l'hypothèse de la présence de gènes de type sexuel dans la mitochondrie de Phytophthora.Mots clés : type sexuel, gènes mitochondriaux, Phytophthora parasitica, Phytophthora capsici.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: November 1, 2005

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1954, this monthly journal contains new research in the field of microbiology including applied microbiology and biotechnology; microbial structure and function; fungi and other eucaryotic protists; infection and immunity; microbial ecology; physiology, metabolism and enzymology; and virology, genetics, and molecular biology. It also publishes review articles and notes on an occasional basis, contributed by recognized scientists worldwide.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more