If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Development of models to predict Pinus radiata productivity throughout New Zealand

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

Development of spatial surfaces describing variation in productivity across broad landscapes at a fine resolution would be of considerable use to forest managers as decision support tools to optimize productivity. In New Zealand, the two most widely used indices to quantify productivity of Pinus radiata D. Don are Site Index and 300 Index. Using an extensive national data set comprising a comprehensive set of national extent maps, multiple regression models and spatial surfaces of these indices for P. radiata were constructed. The final models accounted for 64% and 53%, respectively, of the variance in Site Index and 300 Index. For Site Index, variables included in the final model in order of importance were mean annual air temperature, fractional mean annual available root-zone water storage, mean annual windspeed, length and slope factor, categories describing Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ), and major soil parent material. The variables included in the final model of 300 Index in order of importance included the degree of ground frost during autumn, fractional mean annual available root-zone water storage, categories describing LENZ, vegetation classification, foliar nitrogen, taxonomic soil order, and major soil parent material. These results highlight the utility of thematic spatial layers as driving variables in the development of productivity models.

La mise au point de couches spatiales décrivant la variation de la productivité de grands territoires à une résolution fine serait d’une grande utilité pour les aménagistes forestiers comme outil de support à la décision pour optimiser la productivité. En Nouvelle-Zélande, les deux indices les plus utilisés pour quantifier la productivité de Pinus radiata D. Don sont l’indice de qualité de station («Site Index») et l’indice 300 («300 Index»). À l’aide d’un important fichier de données à l’échelle nationale comprenant un ensemble complet de cartes nationales d’étendue, nous avons construit des modèles de régression multiple et des couches spatiales de ces indices pour P. radiata. Les modèles finaux expliquaient respectivement 64% et 53% de la variance du Site Index et du 300 Index. Pour le Site Index, les variables incluses dans le modèle final étaient, par ordre d’importance, la température annuelle moyenne de l’air, la moyenne annuelle de la fraction disponible de l’eau dans la rhizosphère, la vitesse annuelle moyenne du vent, la longueur et le facteur de pente, des variables catégoriques décrivant les environnements topographiques de la Nouvelle-Zélande (ETNZ) et le principal matériau d’origine du sol. Dans le cas du 300 Index, les variables incluses dans modèle final étaient, par ordre d’importance, l’intensité du gel au sol pendant l’automne, la moyenne annuelle de la fraction disponible de l’eau dans la rhizosphère, les catégories décrivant de l’ETNZ, la classification de végétation, l’azote foliaire, l’ordre taxonomique du sol et le principal matériau d’origine du sol. Ces résultats mettent en évidence l’utilité des couches spatiales thématiques comme variables explicatives importantes dans la mise au point de modèles de productivité.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: March 1, 2010

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more