If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Breakdown and invertebrate colonization of dead wood in wetland, upland, and river habitats

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

Breakdown of woody debris in river and upland habitats as well as the interactions between wood and invertebrates have been well described. Studies of wood in wetlands are rare, and far less is known about breakdown and invertebrate use of wood in these transitional habitats. This study experimentally assessed breakdown and invertebrate colonization of wood in a floodplain wetland and directly related patterns in the wetland to adjacent river and upland habitats. Over a 2.7year period, we monitored breakdown and invertebrate presence in 10cm diameter× 150cm long sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) logs in a floodplain wetland (n = 8), river (n = 5), and upland (n = 4) habitat. Mass loss, decay condition change, and C/N ratios of wetland wood more closely resembled upland than river wood. The overall invertebrate assemblage associated with wetland wood was also more similar to that associated with upland than river wood. Breakdown and invertebrate colonization of wood in the floodplain wetland shared more characteristics with upland than river wood, perhaps because of the seasonal nature of flooding in the wetland. However, the ecology of wood in wetlands also had unique characteristics compared with either the uplands or the river.

La décomposition des débris ligneux dans les habitats riverains et secs a été bien décrite ainsi que les interactions entre les débris ligneux et les invertébrés. Les études portant sur les débris ligneux dans les zones humides sont rares et leur décomposition ainsi que leur utilisation par les invertébrés dans ces habitats de transition sont beaucoup moins connues. La décomposition des débris ligneux et leur colonisation par les invertébrés dans les zones humides sur une plaine inondable ont été étudiées de façon expérimentale et reliées directement à la situation dans les habitats riverains et secs adjacents. Sur une période de 2,7 ans, nous avons suivi la décomposition et la présence des invertébrés dans des billes de liquidambar d’Amérique (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) de 10 cm de diamètre × 150 cm de longueur dans des habitats de zones humides sur une plaine inondable (n = 8), des habitats riverains (n = 5) et des habitats secs (n = 4). La perte de masse, les changements dans l’état de décomposition et le rapport C/N des débris ligneux dans les zones humides se rapprochaient davantage de ce qui a été observé dans les zones sèches que dans les zones riveraines. L’assemblage global des invertébrés associés aux débris ligneux dans les zones humides était également plus semblable à celui qui a été observé dans les zones sèches que dans les zones riveraines. La décomposition des débris ligneux et leur colonisation par les invertébrés dans les zones humides sur une plaine inondable partageaient plus de caractéristiques avec la situation des zones sèches qu’avec celle des zones riveraines, peut-être à cause de la nature saisonnière des inondations dans les zones humides. Cependant, l’écologie des débris ligneux dans les zones humides avait également des caractéristiques propres comparativement à celles des zones riveraines ou sèches.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: October 1, 2008

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more