Skip to main content

Fungi associated with Tomicus minor on Pinus sylvestris in Poland and their succession into the sapwood of beetle-infested windblown trees

Buy Article:

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

The study identified and measured frequency of fungal species associated with Tomicus minor (Hart.) on Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine) in Poland. Additionally, fungal succession in P. sylvestris sapwood was investigated during a 12week period following an attack by this insect. Fungi were isolated from five populations of overwintered adult beetles and their galleries with 59 species of fungi being represented among the 2880 cultures obtained. The most frequent species, Ophiostoma canum (Münch) Syd. & P. Syd., Hormonema dematioides Lagerb. & Melin, and Ambrosiella tingens (Lagerb. & Melin) L.R. Batra, appeared to be specifically associated with T. minor. The succesional changes in species composition during a 12week period following an attack by T. minor were observed. The pattern of fungal succession in P. sylvestris sapwood essentially agreed with a general scheme of fungal succession in tree sapwood infested by bark beetles. Ambrosiella tingens was the first invader of sapwood and occurred most frequently in its deeper layers. Ophiostoma canum, H. dematioides, and other molds were also often isolated from the sapwood; however, they were most common at a depth of 5mm during the initial phase of fungal colonization. Later, Ophiostoma canum followed A. tingens in the sapwood invasion.

Dans cette étude, l’auteur a identifié les espèces de champignons associées à Tomicus minor Hart. sur Pinus sylvestris L. en Pologne et a mesuré leur fréquence. De plus, la succession des champignons dans le bois d’aubier du pin sylvestre a été étudiée pendant une période de 12 semaines à la suite d’une attaque de cet insecte. Les champignons ont été isolés à partir de cinq populations de scolytes adultes qui venaient d’hiberner et de leurs galeries; 59 espèces de champignons étaient représentées parmi les 2880 cultures qui ont été obtenues. Les espèces les plus fréquentes, Ophiostoma canum (Münch) Syd. & P. Syd., Hormonema dematioides Lagerb. & Melin et Ambrosiella tingens (Lagerb. & Melin) L.R. Batra, semblaient spécifiquement associées à T. minor. Les changements dans la composition en espèces dus à la succession ont été observés pendant une période de 12 semaines après une attaque de T. minor. L’allure de la succession des champignons dans le bois d’aubier du pin sylvestre correspondait essentiellement au schéma général de succession des champignons dans le bois d’aubier infesté par des scolytes. Le premier envahisseur du bois d’aubier était A. tingens qui était très souvent présent dans les couches les plus profondes. Ophiostoma canum, H. dematioides et d’autres moisissures ont également été souvent isolés dans le bois d’aubier; cependant, ils étaient surtout présents à une profondeur de 5 mm durant la phase initiale de colonisation par les champignons. Plus tard, O. canum a suivi A. tingens dans l’invasion du bois d’aubier.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: October 1, 2008

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
nrc/cjfr/2008/00000038/00000010/art00003
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more