Skip to main content

Nitrogen limitation in a sweetgum plantation: implications for carbon allocation and storage

Buy Article:

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

The N status of temperate forests is closely linked to their C fluxes, and altered C or N availability may affect ecosystem C storage through changes in forest production and C allocation. We proposed that increased fine-root production previously observed in a sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) forest in response to elevated [CO2] was a physiological response to N limitation. To examine this premise, we fertilized plots in the sweetgum plantation adjacent to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory free-air CO2-enrichment (FACE) experiment. We hypothesized that N fertilization would increase sweetgum net primary production, leaf [N], and the relative flux of C to wood production. Annual additions of 200kg·ha–1 of N as urea increased soil N availability, which increased stand net primary production, stand N uptake, and N requirement by about one-third. Increased leaf [N] and leaf area production in the fertilized plots increased stem production and shifted relative flux of C to wood production. We conclude that sweetgum production on this site is limited by soil N availability and a decreased fraction of net primary production in fine-root production with N addition is consistent with the premise that increased fine-root production in the adjacent FACE experiment is in response to N limitation.

Le statut en N des forêts tempérées est étroitement lié au flux de C et une modification de la disponibilité en C ou N peut affecter l’immobilisation de C dans l’écosystème par le biais de changements dans la productivité de la forêt et de l’allocation en C. Nous croyons que l’augmentation de la production de racines fines déjà observée dans une forêt de copalme d’Amérique (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) à la suite d’une augmentation de la concentration en CO2 constitue une réaction physiologique à une limitation en N. Pour vérifier cette prémisse, nous avons fertilisé des parcelles d’une plantation de copalme d’Amérique adjacente au dispositif expérimental de Oak Ridge sur l’enrichissement en CO2 à l’air libre (FACE). Nous avons posé l’hypothèse que la fertilisation en N augmenterait la production primaire nette et la concentration foliaire en N du copalme d’Amérique et augmenterait la proportion du flux de C allouée à la production de bois. Des amendements annuels de 200 kg·ha–1 de N sous forme d’urée ont augmenté la disponibilité en N du sol, ce qui a augmenté d’environ 33 % la production primaire nette du peuplement, le prélèvement en N du peuplement et les besoins en N. La hausse de la concentration foliaire en N et de la production en surface foliaire observée dans les parcelles fertilisées a augmenté la production des troncs et a changé la proportion du flux de C allouée à la production de bois. Nous concluons que la productivité du copalme d’Amérique sur cette station est limitée par la disponibilité du sol en N et qu’une diminution de la proportion de production primaire nette allouée à la production racinaire à la suite d’un amendement en N est conforme à la prémisse que l’augmentation de la production racinaire observée dans l’expérience FACE adjacente est causée par une déficience en N.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2008-05-01

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free ContentFree content
  • Partial Free ContentPartial Free content
  • New ContentNew content
  • Open Access ContentOpen access content
  • Partial Open Access ContentPartial Open access content
  • Subscribed ContentSubscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed ContentPartial Subscribed content
  • Free Trial ContentFree trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more