If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

The relationship between tree growth patterns and likelihood of mortality: a study of two tree species in the Sierra Nevada

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

We examined mortality of Abies concolor (Gord. & Glend.) Lindl. (white fir) and Pinus lambertiana Dougl. (sugar pine) by developing logistic models using three growth indices obtained from tree rings: average growth, growth trend, and count of abrupt growth declines. For P. lambertiana, models with average growth, growth trend, and count of abrupt declines improved overall prediction (78.6% dead trees correctly classified, 83.7% live trees correctly classified) compared with a model with average recent growth alone (69.6% dead trees correctly classified, 67.3% live trees correctly classified). For A. concolor, counts of abrupt declines and longer time intervals improved overall classification (trees with DBH≥20cm: 78.9% dead trees correctly classified and 76.7% live trees correctly classified vs. 64.9% dead trees correctly classified and 77.9% live trees correctly classified; trees with DBH<20cm: 71.6% dead trees correctly classified and 71.0% live trees correctly classified vs. 67.2% dead trees correctly classified and 66.7% live trees correctly classified). In general, count of abrupt declines improved live-tree classification. External validation of A. concolor models showed that they functioned well at stands not used in model development, and the development of size-specific models demonstrated important differences in mortality risk between understory and canopy trees. Population-level mortality-risk models were developed for A. concolor and generated realistic mortality rates at two sites. Our results support the contention that a more comprehensive use of the growth record yields a more robust assessment of mortality risk.

Nous avons étudié la mortalité chez Abies concolor (Gord. & Glend.) Lindl. et Pinus lambertiana Dougl. en élaborant des modèles logistiques à l’aide de trois indices de croissance obtenus à partir des cernes annuels: la croissance moyenne, la tendance de la croissance et le dénombrement des diminutions abruptes de croissance. Dans le cas de P. lambertiana, les modèles qui incorporaient la croissance moyenne, la tendance de la croissance et le dénombrement des diminutions abruptes de croissance ont globalement amélioré les prédictions (78,6% des arbres morts et 83,7% des arbres vivants ont été correctement classifiés) comparativement à la croissance moyenne récente seule (69,6% des arbres morts et 67,3% des arbres vivants ont été correctement classifiés). Dans le cas de A. concolor, le dénombrement des diminutions abruptes de croissance et l’utilisation d’intervalles de temps plus long ont globalement amélioré la classification des arbres avec un DHP ≥ 20 cm (78,9% des arbres morts et 76,7% des arbres vivants vs. 64,9% des arbres morts et 77,9% des arbres vivants ont été correctement classifiées) et des arbres avec un DHP < 20 cm (71,6% des arbres morts et 71,0% des arbres vivants vs 67,2% des arbres morts et 66,7% des arbres vivants ont été correctement classifiés). En général, les diminutions abruptes de croissance ont amélioré la classification des arbres vivants. Une validation externe des modèles pour A. concolor a montré qu’ils fonctionnent bien dans des peuplements qui n’ont pas été utilisés pour élaborer le modèle. L’élaboration de modèles propres à différentes dimensions a mis en évidence d’importantes différences dans le risque de mortalité entre les arbres de la canopée et ceux du sous-bois. Des modèles de risque de mortalité à l’échelle de la population ont été élaborés pour A. concolor et ces modèles ont généré des taux de mortalité réalistes dans deux stations. Nos résultats supportent l’assertion voulant qu’une utilisation plus poussée des données de croissance permette d’obtenir une évaluation plus robuste du risque de mortalité.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: March 1, 2007

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more