If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Possible causes of slow growth of nitrate-supplied Pinus pinaster

$50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

We investigated possible causes of slower growth of Pinus pinaster Ait. supplied with nitrate, as compared with ammonium or with ammonium nitrate mixtures. Six-month-old mycorrhizal seedlings of P. pinaster were grown in sand culture for 4 months at four concentrations of N (0.125, 0.5, 2.0, or 8.0 mM) as nitrate or ammonium or with an ammonium–nitrate mixture at 0.125 or 2.0 mM. After 4 months of nutrient addition, we measured light-saturated rates of photosynthesis (Amax), rates of ammonium and nitrate uptake, growth, macro- and micro-elements, and patterns of N allocation in needles. Dry mass was unaffected by N form at 0.125 or 0.5 mM N. In contrast, dry mass of seedlings supplied with ammonium or ammonium nitrate at 2.0 and 8.0 mM N, was approximately threefold greater than seedlings supplied with nitrate alone. Concentrations of N in foliage and Amax were unaffected by the form or concentration of N supplied. Furthermore, concentrations of amino acid N were greater in seedlings supplied with nitrate, suggesting rates of uptake were not limiting growth. Foliage concentrations of zinc were low with nitrate supplied at a concentration of 0.5 mM or greater, and seedlings displayed symptoms typical of zinc deficiency when nitrate was supplied at 2.0 or 8.0 mM. Slower growth with nitrate could not be explained solely by either slower root uptake of nitrate N or lesser Amax. Instead, aspects of N metabolism postuptake coupled with other factors such as nutrient deficiencies may limit growth with nitrate as the sole N source.

Nous avons étudié les causes potentielles du ralentissement de la croissance de Pinus pinaster Ait. en présence de nitrate comparativement à de l'ammonium ou à des mélanges d'ammonium et de nitrate. Des semis de P. pinaster mycorhizés, âgés de 6 mois, ont été cultivés dans le sable pendant 4 mois en présence de quatre concentrations de N (0,125, 0,5, 2,0 et 8,0 mM) sous forme de nitrate ou d'ammonium ou d'un mélange de 0,125 ou 2,0 mM d'ammonium et de nitrate. Après 4 mois, nous avons mesuré le taux de photosynthèse sous saturation lumineuse (Amax), le taux d'absorption d'ammonium et de nitrate, la croissance, les macro- et micro-éléments et les patrons d'allocation de N dans les aiguilles. Le poids sec n'était pas affecté par la forme de N à 0,125 ou 0,5 mM. Par contre, le poids sec des semis cultivés avec 2,0 et 8,0 mM de N sous forme d'ammonium ou d'un mélange d'ammonium et de nitrate était trois fois plus élevé que celui des semis cultivés avec du nitrate seul. La concentration foliaire de N et la valeur de Amax n'étaient pas affectées par la forme ou la concentration de N. De plus, la concentration de N sous forme d'acides aminés était plus élevée dans les semis cultivés en présence de nitrate, ce qui indique que le taux d'absorption ne limitait pas la croissance. La concentration foliaire de zinc était faible en présence de nitrate à une concentration de 0,5 mM ou plus et les semis montraient des symptômes typiques d'une déficience en zinc en présence de 2,0 ou 8,0 mM de nitrate. Le ralentissement de la croissance en présence de nitrate ne peut s'expliquer uniquement par une absorption plus lente de N sous forme de nitrate ni par une diminution de la valeur de Amax. Au lieu de cela, certains aspects du métabolisme de N, une fois celui-ci absorbé, combinés à d'autres facteurs tels que des déficiences en nutriments, peuvent limiter la croissance en présence de nitrate comme seule source de N.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: April 1, 2002

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more