Interaction of vegetation control and fertilization on conifer species across the Pacific Northwest

Authors: Rose, R.; Ketchum, J.S.

Source: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Volume 32, Number 1, January 2002 , pp. 136-152(17)

Publisher: NRC Research Press

Buy & download fulltext article:

OR

Price: $50.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

An experiment evaluating three levels of vegetation competition control (no control, 1.5 m2 of vegetation control, and 3.3 m2 of vegetation control), each with two fertilization treatments (fertilization at the time of planting with complete slow-release fertilizer (Woodace® IBDU), or no fertilization), was installed at five sites. Two of these sites were planted with Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Oregon Coast Range, one with ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. Laws. & C. Laws.) in eastern Washington, one with western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) in the coastal hemlock zone in Oregon, and one with coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.) in northern California. At four of the five sites, mean stem volume, basal diameter, and height of seedlings increased significantly with increasing area of weed control, and the magnitude of difference between treatments increased with time. Fertilization significantly increased seedling size only at the two sites with adequate soil moisture; increases were marginally significant at a third. Response to fertilization was less than from weed control and impacted growth for only the first year, whereas the influence of weed control continued to influence growth the entire length of the study (4 years). Area of vegetation control and fertilization did not interact significantly at any site.

Une expérience destinée à évaluer trois intensités de maîtrise de la végétation compétitrice (aucun traitement et traitements de 1,5 et de 3,3 m2) combinées à deux traitements de fertilisation (fertilisation au moment de la plantation avec un fertilisant complet à action lente (Woodace® IBDU) ou aucune fertilisation) a été installée à cinq endroits. Deux des sites ont été plantés avec des douglas de Menzies (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) dans la chaîne côtière de l'Oregon, un avec des pins ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. Laws. & C. Laws.) dans l'est de l'état de Washington, un avec des pruches de l'Ouest (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) dans la zone côtière de la pruche en Oregon et un avec le séquoia côtier (Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.) dans le nord de la Californie. Dans quatre des cinq sites, le volume moyen de la tige, le diamètre à la base et la hauteur des semis ont significativement augmenté avec l'augmentation de l'intensité de la maîtrise de la végétation et l'ampleur de la différence entre les traitements a augmenté avec le temps. La fertilisation a significativement augmenté la dimension des semis à seulement deux endroits où l'humidité du sol était adéquate; les augmentations étaient très légèrement significatives à un troisième endroit. L'impact de la fertilisation a été moins fort que celui de la maîtrise de la végétation et a eu un effet sur la croissance pendant la première année seulement, tandis que l'effet de la maîtrise de la végétation sur la croissance s'est poursuivi pendant toute la durée de l'étude (4 ans). Il n'y avait pas d'interaction significative entre l'intensité de la maîtrise de la végétation et la fertilisation dans aucun des sites.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: January 1, 2002

More about this publication?
  • Published since 1971, this monthly journal features articles, reviews, notes and commentaries on all aspects of forest science, including biometrics and mensuration, conservation, disturbance, ecology, economics, entomology, fire, genetics, management, operations, pathology, physiology, policy, remote sensing, social science, soil, silviculture, wildlife and wood science, contributed by internationally respected scientists. It also publishes special issues dedicated to a topic of current interest.
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Sample Issue
  • Reprints & Permissions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content

Text size:

A | A | A | A
Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. print icon Print this page