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Interaction of dietary sodium chloride and waterborne copper in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): copper toxicity and sodium and chloride homeostasis

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Abstract:

Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) maintained on either low sodium chloride (LS (control), 1.4% NaCl) or high sodium chloride (HS, 11% NaCl) diet were exposed to 55 µg·L–1 waterborne copper (Cu) for 28 days. Cu-exposed fish maintained on the LS diet exhibited 26% mortality, more than double (11%) that in fish maintained on the HS diet. Waterborne Cu exposure inhibited growth by 56% in fish maintained on the LS diet and by 35% in those maintained on the HS diet. Whole-body and tissue Na+ levels, measured 6 h after feeding, were increased by exposure to HS diet and reduced by waterborne Cu exposure. Exposure to elevated waterborne Cu increased whole-body and tissue Cu levels, whereas exposure to HS diet decreased these levels. Moreover, whole-body and tissue Cu concentrations were consistently lower in Cu-exposed fish maintained on HS diet relative to those maintained on LS diet. Plasma Na+ and Cl levels were elevated by HS diet exposure and reduced by waterborne Cu exposure, whereas plasma Cu levels were decreased and increased by exposure to HS diet and waterborne Cu, respectively. These results demonstrate that elevated dietary NaCl modulates Na+ and Cl homeostasis and reduces accumulation and toxicity of waterborne Cu.

Des jeunes truites arc-en-ciel (Oncorhynchus mykiss), gardées à un régime faible (témoin) en chlorure de sodium (LS, 1,4 % NaCl) ou à un régime élevé (HS, 11 % NaCl), ont été exposés à 55 µg·L–1 de Cu en solution aqueuse pendant 28 jours. Les poissons gardés à un régime LS ont souffert une mortalité de 26 %, plus du double de celle (11 %) des poissons gardés au régime HS. L'exposition au Cu en solution aqueuse réduit la croissance des poissons gardés au régime LS de 56 % et celle des poissons gardés à HS de 35 %. Les concentrations de Na+ dans le corps entier et les tissus, mesurées 6 h après l'alimentation, augmentent après un régime HS et diminuent après une exposition au Cu en solution aqueuse. Une exposition aux concentrations élevée de Cu en solution aqueuse augmente les concentrations de Cu dans le corps entier et les tissus, alors qu'un régime HS les diminue. De plus, les concentrations de Cu dans le corps entier et les tissus sont toujours plus faibles chez les poissons gardés à un régime HS et exposés au Cu que chez les poissons gardés au régime LS et exposés au cuivre. Les concentrations plasmatiques de Na+ et de Cl augmentent avec un régime HS et diminuent après une exposition au Cu en solution aqueuse; en revanche, les concentrations plasmatiques de Cu diminuent à un régime HS et augmentent après une exposition au Cu en solution aqueuse. Ces résultats montrent qu'une augmentation de NaCl dans le régime module l'homéostasie de Na+ et de Cl et réduit l'accumulation et la toxicité du Cu en solution aqueuse.[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: February 1, 2005

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  • Published continuously since 1901 (under various titles), this monthly journal is the primary publishing vehicle for the multidisciplinary field of aquatic sciences. It publishes perspectives (syntheses, critiques, and re-evaluations), discussions (comments and replies), articles, and rapid communications, relating to current research on cells, organisms, populations, ecosystems, or processes that affect aquatic systems. The journal seeks to amplify, modify, question, or redirect accumulated knowledge in the field of fisheries and aquatic science. Occasional supplements are dedicated to single topics or to proceedings of international symposia.
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