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Interaction of viral oncoproteins with cellular target molecules: infection with high-risk vs low-risk human papillomaviruses

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Abstract:

Pim D, Banks L. Interaction of viral oncoproteins with cellular target molecules: infection with high-risk vs low-risk human papillomaviruses. APMIS 2010; 118: 471–493.

Persistent infection by a subgroup of so-called high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that have a tropism for mucosal epithelia has been defined as the cause of more than 98% of cervical carcinomas as well as a high proportion of other cancers of the anogenital region. Infection of squamous epithelial tissues in the head and neck region by these same high-risk HPVs is also associated with a subset of cancers. Despite the general conservation of genetic structure amongst all HPV types, infection by the low-risk types, whether in genital or head and neck sites, carries a negligible risk of malignant progression, and infections have a markedly different pathology. In this review, we will examine and discuss the interactions that the principal viral oncoproteins of the high-risk mucosotrophic HPVs and their counterparts from the low-risk group make with cellular target proteins, with a view to explaining the differences in their respective pathology.

Keywords: E6; E7; Human papillomaviruses; PDZ proteins; chromosomal instability; p53; pRB

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0463.2010.02618.x

Publication date: 2010-06-01

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