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Post-polio syndrome: epidemiologic and prognostic aspects in Brazil

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Abstract:

Conde MTRP, Oliveira ASB, Quadros AAJ, Moreira GA, Silva HCA, Pereira RDB, e Silva TM, Tufik S, Waldman EA. Post-polio syndrome: epidemiologic and prognostic aspects in Brazil.

Acta Neurol Scand 2009: 120: 191–197.

© 2008 The Authors Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard. Objectives – 

To describe the clinical and epidemiological aspects of post-polio syndrome (PPS) and identify predictors of its severity. Materials and methods – 

132 patients with PPS were selected at the Neuromuscular Disease Outpatient Clinic of the Federal University of São Paulo. Descriptive analysis was carried out and predictors of PPS severe forms were investigated using an unconditional logistic regression. Results – 

The average age at onset was 39.4 years. The most common symptoms were fatigue (87.1%), muscle pain (82.4%) and joint pain (72.0%); 50.4% of the cases were severe. The following were associated with PPS severity: a ≤4-year period of neurological recovery (OR 2.8), permanent damage in two limbs (OR 3.6) and residence at the time of acute polio in a city with more advanced medical assistance (OR 2.5). Conclusions – 

Health professionals should carefully evaluate polio survivors for PPS and be aware of the implications of muscle overuse in the neurological recovery period.

Keywords: Brazil; disease severity; post-polio syndrome; predictive factors

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0404.2008.01142.x

Affiliations: 1: Department of Neuromuscular Diseases, Paulista School of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 2: Sleep Institute, Paulista School of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 3: School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Publication date: September 1, 2009

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