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Are multi family groups appropriate for patients with first episode psychosis? A 5-year naturalistic follow-up study

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Abstract:

Rossberg JI, Johannessen JO, Klungsoyr O, Opjordsmoen S, Evensen J, Fjell A, Haahr U, Joa I, Langeveld J, Larsen TK, Melle I, Rund BR, Simonsen E, ten Velden W, Vaglum P, Friis S, McGlashan T. Are multi family groups appropriate for patients with first episode psychosis? A 5-year naturalistic follow-up study. Objective: 

To compare outcome over 5 years for patients who participated in multi family groups (MFGs) to those who refused or were not offered participation. Method: 

Of 301 first episode psychotic patients aged 15–65 years, 147 participated in MFGs. Outcome was measured by drop-out rates, positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) symptom scores, and duration of psychotic episodes during the follow-up period. Results: 

Multi family group participants had a significantly lower drop-out rates at 5-year follow-up than patients who did not participate. However, the MFG participants had significantly less improvement in PANSS positive and excitative symptoms and had significantly longer duration of psychotic symptoms during the follow-up period. Conclusion: 

Multi family groups appear to increase the chance of retaining patients in a follow-up study, but adjustment of the programme may be necessary with first episode psychosis patients to meet their needs better.

Keywords: family therapy; first episode; outcome; psychosis

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0447.2010.01571.x

Affiliations: 1: Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway 2: Stavanger University Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, Stavanger 3: Early Psychosis Intervention Center and University of Copenhagen, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Denmark 4: Asker and Bærum Hospital Trust and Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway 5: Psychiatric Research Unit and University of Copenhagen, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Denmark 6: Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway 7: Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

Publication date: November 1, 2010

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