If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Reducing delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture: a multi-factorial intervention study

$48.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

Background:

There is an evident need for improved management of elderly patients with trauma in order to avoid common and troublesome complications such as delirium. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an implementation of a multi-factorial program including intensified pre-hospital and perioperative treatment and care could reduce the incidence of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture, cognitively intact at admission to the hospital. In addition, we explored the factors that characterize patients who developed delirium. Methods:

A prospective, quasi-experimental design was used. A total of 263 patients with hip fracture (≥65 years), cognitively intact at admission, were consecutively included between April 2003 and April 2004. On 1 October 2003, a new program was introduced. All patients were screened for cognitive impairment within 30 min after admission to the emergency department using The Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ). To screen for delirium, patients were tested within 4 h of admission and thereafter daily, using the Organic Brain Syndrome scale. Results:

The number of patients who developed delirium during hospitalization was 74 (28.1%), with a decrease from 34% (45 of 132) in the control group to 22% (29 of 131) in the intervention group (P=0.031). Patients who developed delirium were statistically older, more often had >4 prescribed drugs at admission and scored less well in the SPMSQ test. Conclusion:

The use of a multi-factorial intervention program in elderly hip fracture patients, lucid at admission, reduced the incidence of delirium during hospitalization by 35%.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2010.02232.x

Affiliations: 1: Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences 2: Psychogeriatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden 3: Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden 4: Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Clinical Sciences

Publication date: July 1, 2010

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more