Skip to main content

Analgesic and antiemetic effect of ketorolac vs. betamethasone or dexamethasone after ambulatory surgery

Buy Article:

$51.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Background: 

Glucocorticoids are known to provide slower onset and more prolonged duration of analgesic effect than ketorolac. In the present study, we wanted to evaluate the effect over time from a single dose of either intravenous (i.v.) dexamethasone or an intramuscular (i.m.) depot formulation of betamethasone compared with i.v. ketorolac. Materials and methods: 

One hundred and seventy-nine patients admitted for mixed ambulatory surgery were included in the study. After induction of general i.v. anaesthesia, the patients were randomized to receive double-blindly either dexamethasone 4 mg i.v. (Group D) or betamethasone depot formulation 12 mg i.m. (Group B) or ketorolac 30 mg i.v. (Group K). Fentanyl was used for rescue analgesic medication in the post-operative care unit (PACU) and codeine with paracetamol after discharge, for a study period of 3 days. Results: 

There was significantly less post-operative pain in the ketorolac group during the stay in the unit (88% with minor or less pain in Group K vs. 74% and 67% in Groups D and B, respectively, P < 0.05), significantly less need for rescue medication (P < 0.05) and significantly less nausea or vomiting (12% in Group K vs. 30% in the other groups pooled, P < 0.05). The ketorolac patients were significantly faster for ready discharge, median 165 min vs. 192 min and 203 min in Groups D and B, respectively (P < 0.01). There were no differences between the groups in perceived pain, nausea, vomiting or rescue analgesic consumption in the 4- to 72-h period. Conclusion: 

Dexamethasone 4 mg or bethamethasone 12 mg did not provide prolonged post-operative analgesic effect compared with ketorolac 30 mg, which was superior for analgesia and antiemesis in the PACU.

Keywords: Ketorolac; ambulatory surgery; betamethasone; dexamethasone; glucocorticoids; post-operative nausea and vomiting; post-operative pain

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2006.01240.x

Affiliations: Departments of Anaesthesiology and Day Surgery, University of Oslo, Faculty Division, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway

Publication date: March 1, 2007

mksg/aas/2007/00000051/00000003/art00001
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more