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Open Access Metaphors and Medication: Understanding Medication Use by Seniors in Everyday Life Métaphores et médicaments : pour comprendre la question de la prise de médicaments quotidienne chez les aînés

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Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to explore the use of metaphor by independent seniors taking medication for chronic health conditions. Narratives from a larger study using grounded theory were analyzed using constant comparative analysis and induction. A secondary analysis of the narratives of 21 participants was undertaken. Transcripts were read line-by-line and all relevant language was highlighted and reviewed with the aim of identifying relationships and themes. The narratives revealed a diverse range of metaphoric language. Four categories were identified: being shackled, hope, external authority, and communication fears. Three additional themes were interwoven into the narratives: aging and death, medication personified, and the body as object. The authors conclude that metaphor reveals the tension and unresolved dilemmas faced by seniors with regard to medication use.

French
Cette étude avait pour objectif d'explorer l'utilisation de métaphores chez les aînés autonomes prenant des médicaments pour des maladies chroniques. Des témoignages tirés d'une étude plus vaste fondée sur des théories empiriques ont été soumis à une analyse comparative constante et un processus d'induction. Une deuxième analyse des témoignages de 21 participants a été réalisée. Chaque ligne des transcriptions ont été étudiées de façon à relever et cerner le langage pertinent et à déterminer les liens et les thèmes présents. Les témoignages contenaient diverses métaphores. Quatre catégories ont été relevées : l'enchaînement, l'espoir, l'autorité extérieure et les craintes relatives à la communication. Trois autres thèmes étaient également présents : le vieillissement et la mort, la personnification des médicaments et le corps en tant qu'objet. Les auteurs ont conclu que l'utilisation de métaphores chez les aînés révèle la présence de tensions et de dilemmes non résolus relativement à la prise de médicaments.

Keywords: CHRONIC ILLNESS; MEDICATION USE; METAPHOR; NARRATIVES; OLDER ADULTS

Document Type: Short Communication

Publication date: 2012-09-01

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