Root and shoot allometry of bareroot and container Douglas-fir seedlings

Authors: Rose, Robin1; Haase, Diane L.2

Source: New Forests, Volume 30, Numbers 2-3, September 2005 , pp. 215-233(19)

Publisher: Springer

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Abstract:

Detailed root and shoot development of bareroot and container Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedling stocktypes were compared during the first growing season after outplanting. The study was installed in raised beds with ideal environmental conditions and at a field reforestation site. Survival at both sites was 98% and did not differ between stocktypes. Seedlings were excavated in spring (5, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after planting) and in fall (35, 40, and 45 weeks after planting). In spring, container seedlings had more numbers of new roots and greater new root and shoot biomass than bareroot seedlings at both sites. In fall, bareroot seedlings consistently averaged more new root growth (though nonsignificant) than container seedlings suggesting that stocktype differences may not continue long-term. Container seedlings had significantly greater water percent than bareroot seedlings at the field site (all sample dates) and the raised bed site (weeks 5, 8, and 40 only). Regardless of environmental conditions or season, seedlings at both sites maintained water percent between 60 and 70% of fresh weight. Seedlings grown in the raised beds had much greater growth than those grown in the field. However, relative growth patterns for the two stocktypes were very similar on each site. The data generated establish baseline differences between stocktypes for root initiation, growth, and allometry during the first year after planting. Challenges associated with root development research are discussed.

Keywords: Biomass allocation; Morphology; Rhizosphere temperature; Root development; Seedling growth; Water percent

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11056-005-5420-5

Affiliations: 1: Nursery Technology Cooperative, Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, 321 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA, 2: Nursery Technology Cooperative, Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, 321 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA, Email: diane.haase@oregonstate.edu

Publication date: September 1, 2005

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