Husserl and the Penetrability of the Transcendental and Mundane Spheres

Author: Arp, Robert

Source: Human Studies, Volume 27, Number 3, 2004 , pp. 221-239(19)

Publisher: Springer

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Abstract:

There is a two-fold problem the phenomenologist must face: the first has to do with thinking like a phenomenologist given that one is always already steeped in the mundane sphere; the second has to do with the phenomenologist entering into dialogue with those scientists, psychologists, sociologists and other laypersons who still remain in the mundane sphere. I address the first problem by giving an Husserlian-inspired account of the movement from the mundane to the transcendental, and show that there are decent prospects for getting life-world folks to start thinking like phenomenologists. I address the second problem by showing that Husserl has himself caught in a dilemma: either the reduction takes place and no communication is possible between phenomenologist and non-phenomenologist, or the reduction does not take place and the phenomenological method remains a psychological makeshift, supposedly accessible to Husserl and his esoteric followers.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:HUMA.0000042127.53041.57

Affiliations: Department of Philosophy, Saint Louis University, 3800 Lindell Blvd., St.Louis, MO 63156-0907, U.S.A., Email: arpr@slu.ed

Publication date: January 1, 2004

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