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Thermal stress in the U.S.A.: effects on violence and on employee behaviour

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Abstract:

Many researchers have claimed to find a link between temperature and aggression; we use U.S.A. data to confirm strong seasonal patterns in several types of violent crime. We also report seasonal patterns in U.S.A. workplace data (strikes, and quitting jobs). We suggest a medical explanation for these seasonal patterns, based on stress hormones (adrenaline, and perhaps noradrenaline and/or testosterone). The human body generates adrenaline in response to excessive heat;  adrenaline is helpful in keeping the body within safe limits, but we think that as a side effect  it leads to aggression (which is often inappropriate). We examine the shape of the curve relating temperature to aggression. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keywords: employee behaviour; stress hormones; thermal stress

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.1029

Affiliations: 1: Management Department, Birkbeck College (University of London), London, UK 2: Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK

Publication date: 2005-02-01

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