If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Free Content Nitrogen uptake and NH4+ regeneration by pelagic microplankton and marine snow from the North Atlantic

 Download
(PDF 824.1kb)
 
Download Article:

Abstract:

Comparative rates of nitrogen uptake and NH4+ regeneration by plankton of <153 and <5 m in size were determined in the Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream, and by plankton associated with marine snow in the Gulf Stream during May 1982. Rates of total nitrogen uptake of Sargasso Sea phytoplankton exceeded those of the Gulf Stream phytoplankton by factors ranging from 1.8 to 5.6. Rates of microplankton NH4+ regeneration equaled or exceeded rates of NH4+ uptake in the Sargasso Sea, but in the Gulf Stream were negligible in all but one case. Significant rates of NH4+ regeneration were measured for Gulf Stream marine snow, and, in all but one case, exceeded those of NH4+ uptake. Rates of NO3 and urea uptake by the snow were less than half those of NH4+. Protozoan densities were enumerated on aliquots of the same snow particles and compared with previously reported bacterial estimates; enrichment factors of the cultivable ciliates and flagellates were 6500–9000 relative to ambient seawater. These organisms were also grazing and reproducing rapidly. Bacterial densities were also moderately enriched, but their productivity was lower than surrounding seawater bacteria. Thus, the large bacterivorous population associated with marine snow may have accounted for a substantial fraction of the observed NH4+ regeneration.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1357/002224088785113405

Publication date: November 1, 1988

More about this publication?
  • The Journal of Marine Research publishes peer-reviewed research articles covering a broad array of topics in physical, biological and chemical oceanography. Articles that deal with processes, as well as those that report significant observations, are welcome. In the area of biology, studies involving coupling between ecological and physical processes are preferred over those that report systematics. Authors benefit from thorough reviews of their manuscripts, where an attempt is made to maximize clarity. The time between submission and publication is kept to a minimum; there is no page charge.
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more