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Free Content Contribution of CD14-159C/T polymorphism to tuberculosis susceptibility: a meta-analysis

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BACKGROUND: CD14 plays an important role in recognising the tuberculosis (TB) antigen and initiating immune response. CD14-159C/T polymorphism has been reported to be associated with susceptibility to TB in some, but not all studies.

OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively evaluate the correlation between CD14-159C/T polymorphism and susceptibility to TB.

METHODS: Relevant studies from six English-language databases were searched up to 15 March 2013. Crude odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of associations.

RESULTS: Eight eligible studies including 3583 subjects were retained for the meta-analysis. T-allele and TT homozygosis might increase TB risk in the overall analysis (T vs. C: OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.03–1.64, P = 0.03 and TT vs. CC+CT: OR 1.52, 95%CI 1.12–2.08, P = 0.01). Similar correlations were observed among human immunodeficiency virus negative subjects. Strong associations were also found between CD14-159C/T and TB in Asians. Asian individuals with the T-allele and the TT genotype had a significantly increased risk of TB (T vs. C: OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.27–1.68, P = 0.00; TT vs. CC: OR 1.83, 95%CI 1.38–2.44, P = 0.00 and TT vs. CC+CT: OR 1.84, 95%CI 1.55–2.19, P = 0.00). No associations were detected in the pulmonary TB and extra-pulmonary TB groups.

CONCLUSION: CD14-159C/T contributes to TB susceptibility; the T-allele and TT homozygosis are potential risk factors, particularly in Asians.
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Keywords: Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; genome-wide association study; innate immunity; single nucleotide polymorphism

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China 2: School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceutical R&D, Shanghai, China 3: Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceutical R&D, Shanghai, China 4: Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceutical R&D, Shanghai, China 5: Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; and Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Publication date: 2013-11-01

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  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease publishes articles on all aspects of lung health, including public health-related issues such as training programmes, cost-benefit analysis, legislation, epidemiology, intervention studies and health systems research. The IJTLD is dedicated to the continuing education of physicians and health personnel and the dissemination of information on tuberculosis and lung health world-wide.

    Certain IJTLD articles are selected for translation into French, Spanish, Chinese or Russian. They are available on the Union website

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