Skip to main content

Free Content Safety and efficacy of nevirapine- and efavirenz-based antiretroviral treatment in adults treated for TB-HIV co-infection in Botswana

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 413.7 kb)
 

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The safety and efficacy of nevirapine (NVP) and efavirenz (EFV) based highly active antiretroviral treatment (ART) with concurrent anti-tuberculosis treatment in sub-Saharan Africa has not been well established.

METHODS: We performed a retrospective study comparing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults exposed and not exposed to tuberculosis (TB) treatment with similar baseline HIV-1 RNA levels who were started on ART as part of Botswana's ART Programme. ART regimens, HIV-1 RNA, CD4+ cell count, and liver function tests were reviewed for 12 months following ART initiation.

RESULTS: Among 155 patients on ART only and 155 exposed to TB treatment, there was no difference in virologic or immunologic response throughout the first year of ART. Furthermore, there remained no differences in virologic or immunologic outcomes when NVP and EFV groups were stratified by TB treatment exposure status. While more hepatotoxic events occurred in the group exposed to TB treatment than in those not exposed (9% vs. 3%, P = 0.05), there was no difference between patients treated with NVP and those treated with EFV.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients co-infected with HIV and TB in Botswana can be treated effectively with either NVP- or EFV-based ART and TB treatment. As hepatotoxic events were more common in the group exposed to TB treatment, liver function tests should be monitored closely.

Keywords: Africa; HIV; co-infection; tuberculosis

Document Type: Regular Paper

Affiliations: 1: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA 2: Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA 3: Botswana–Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative Partnership for HIV Research and Education, Gaborone, Botswana; and Adult Infectious Disease Care Clinic (IDCC), Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana 4: Botswana–Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative Partnership for HIV Research and Education, Gaborone, Botswana 5: Adult Infectious Disease Care Clinic (IDCC), Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana 6: Ministry of Health, Gaborone, Botswana 7: Botswana National Tuberculosis Programme, Gaborone, Botswana 8: Botswana–Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative Partnership for HIV Research and Education, Gaborone, Botswana; and Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Publication date: March 1, 2009

More about this publication?
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease publishes articles on all aspects of lung health, including public health-related issues such as training programmes, cost-benefit analysis, legislation, epidemiology, intervention studies and health systems research. The IJTLD is dedicated to the continuing education of physicians and health personnel and the dissemination of information on tuberculosis and lung health world-wide.

    Certain IJTLD articles are selected for translation into French, Spanish, Chinese or Russian. They are available on the Union website

  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
  • Public Health Action
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
iuatld/ijtld/2009/00000013/00000003/art00015
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more