Free Content Predominant VNTR family of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from South Asian patients

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Abstract:

SETTING: Despite the low incidence of tuberculosis in the UK, some minority ethnic groups, particularly those originating from South Asia, experience very high incidence rates.

OBJECTIVE: Comparison of the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) profiles of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis circulating in an immigrant community in the UK with those found in the country of ethnic origin.

DESIGN: Isolates of M. tuberculosis were collected from samples obtained from patients attending clinics in Leeds and Bradford, UK and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Strains were compared using VNTR analysis and mixed-linker PCR.

RESULTS: Comparison of VNTR profiles found that one profile (42235) represented 37% of patient isolates from Rawalpindi and 23% of patient isolates in Leeds and Bradford, where it was associated exclusively with patients with South Asian names. A second profile (02235) represented 15% of patient isolates in Leeds and Bradford, and was also exclusively associated with the South Asian community. These profiles could be subdivided by mixed-linker PCR analysis.

CONCLUSION: The VNTR profile 42235 may represent a family of strains commonly found in communities associated with South Asia.

Keywords: Pakistan; VNTR analysis; ethnicity; strain typing

Document Type: Regular Paper

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.0000/09640569512995

Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology, The General Infirmary, Leeds, UK; and the Division of Microbiology, School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2: Division of Microbiology, School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 3: Bradford Health Authority, Shipley, Bradford, UK 4: Association for Social Development, Islamabad, Pakistan 5: Department of Microbiology, The Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan 6: Department of Microbiology, The General Infirmary, Leeds, UK 7: TB Service, St LukeÕs Hospital, Bradford, UK 8: Department of Microbiology, The General Infirmary, Leeds, UK; the Division of Microbiology, School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; and the Division of Immunity and Infection, University of Birmingham, Bir

Publication date: June 1, 2002

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  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease publishes articles on all aspects of lung health, including public health-related issues such as training programmes, cost-benefit analysis, legislation, epidemiology, intervention studies and health systems research. The IJTLD is dedicated to the continuing education of physicians and health personnel and the dissemination of information on tuberculosis and lung health world-wide.

    Certain IJTLD articles are selected for translation into French, Spanish, Chinese or Russian. They are available on the Union website

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