Skip to main content

Embodiment and meaning: Understanding chronic pelvic pain

Buy Article:

$27.68 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

The case of chronic pelvic pain in women is presented as an example to explore firstly, the problem of medical knowledge on, and interventions for, chronic pain; secondly, current new developments at the intersection of neuroscience and phenomenology, in particular Varela's proposal for a 'neurophenomenology'; and thirdly, methodological issues of significance for social interpretive sciences to enable their active contribution to this research programme. This paper argues that a non-dualistic concept of embodiment is fundamental to developing understandings of chronic pain, and that contributions from critical phenomenology need to be augmented with analyses from socio-political and cultural research. The social interpretive sciences, to contribute to a fully interdisciplinary neurophenomenology, need a methodology for analysing meanings (particularly narrative) within a theorization of language that is commensurate with critical phenomenological accounts of embodiment

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Social Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand., Email: victoria.grace@canterbury.ac.nz

Publication date: January 1, 2003

imp/jcs/2003/00000010/00000011/art00003
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more