Do we have free will?

Author: Libet, B.

Source: Journal of Consciousness Studies, Volume 6, Numbers 8-9, 1999 , pp. 47-57(11)

Publisher: Imprint Academic

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Abstract:

I have taken an experimental approach to this question. Freely voluntary acts are preceded by a specific electrical change in the brain (the ‘readiness potential', RP) that begins 550 ms before the act. Human subjects became aware of intention to act 350-400 ms after RP starts, but 200 ms. before the motor act. The volitional process is therefore initiated unconsciously. But the conscious function could still control the outcome; it can veto the act. Free will is therefore not excluded. These findings put constraints on views of how free will may operate; it would not initiate a voluntary act but it could control performance of the act. The findings also affect views of guilt and responsibility. But the deeper question still remains: Are freely voluntary acts subject to macro-deterministic laws or can they appear without such constraints, non-determined by natural laws and ‘truly free'? I shall present an experimentalist view about these fundamental philosophical opposites.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0444, USA.

Publication date: January 1, 1999

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