Skip to main content

THE LIFE OF CASTRUCCIO CASTRACANI: MACHIAVELLI AS LITERARY ARTIST, HISTORIAN, TEACHER AND PHILOSOPHER

Buy Article:

$18.20 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Most scholars have taken Machiavelli's Life of Castruccio Castracani to exemplify his understanding of the role of both fortune and virtue in acquiring political power. The problem with this straight-forward reading is that the good fortune and virtue Machiavelli attributes to Castruccio are largely products of Machiavelli's own imagination and consequent alterations of the historical record, which undercut Machiavelli's exaggerated praise of the petty tyrant. By contrasting the qualities and deeds for which Machiavelli praises Castruccio with what he or the historical record shows that Castruccio actually did, readers can see the difference between what Machiavelli thought a truly fortunate and virtuous politician would do and what a petty tyrant would do. Machiavelli's uncharacteristic borrowings from the sayings of earlier philosophers at the end of the Life also bring to the fore questions about the character and philosophical basis of Machiavelli's own role as a political educator.
No References
No Citations
No Supplementary Data
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Dept. of Political Science, University of Notre Dame, 350 Decio Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA., Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 2010-01-01

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more