PIRATES, PRIVATEERS AND THE CONTRACT THEORIES OF HOBBES AND LOCKE

$28.95 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

A company of buccaneers invites comparison with states founded on the social contracts of Hobbes and Locke. These companies were formed by an explicit contract, the articles of agreement, and transgressors risked being marooned in a literal state of nature. Buccaneers were relatively powerful and their authority structure and share system was relatively democratic. The role of venture capitalists in organizing buccaneering may explain why parallels with Locke's social contract are particularly striking. Matthew Tindall attempted to exclude pirates and include privateers in the social contract, but conceded that sufficiently powerful pirates themselves formed states. These comparisons highlight the problem of basing human rights on contract theory.

Keywords: Augustine; John Locke; Matthew Tindall; Thomas Hobbes; articles of agreement; buccaneering; commonwealth; democracy; piracy; privateering; social contract; state of nature

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Faculty of Education and Society, University of Sunderland, Priestman Building, Sunderland, SR1 3PZ, Email: peter.hayes@sunderland.ac.uk

Publication date: January 1, 2008

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more