Salmonella enterica Biofilm Formation and Density in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Biofilm Reactor Model Is Related to Serovar and Substratum

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Abstract:

Foodborne pathogens can attach to, and survive on, food contact surfaces for long periods by forming a biofilm. Salmonella enterica is the second most common cause of foodborne illness in Ireland. The ability of S. enterica to form a biofilm could contribute to its persistence in food production areas, leading to cross-contamination of products and surfaces. Arising from a large foodborne outbreak of S. enterica serovar Agona associated with a food manufacturing environment, a hypothesis was formulated that the associated Salmonella Agona strain had an enhanced ability to form a biofilm relative to other S. enterica. To investigate this hypothesis, 12 strains of S. enterica, encompassing three S. enterica serovars, were assessed for the ability to form a biofilm on multiple food contact surfaces. All isolates formed a biofilm on the contact surfaces, and there was no consistent trend for the Salmonella Agona outbreak strain to produce a denser biofilm compared with other strains of Salmonella Agona or Salmonella Typhimurium. However, Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm was considerably less dense than Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Agona biofilms. Biofilm density was greater on tile than on concrete, polycarbonate, stainless steel, or glass.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-12-303

Affiliations: 1: Antimicrobial Resistance and Microbial Ecology Group, Discipline of Bacteriology, School of Medicine, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. mary.corcoran@nuigalway.ie 2: Antimicrobial Resistance and Microbial Ecology Group, Discipline of Bacteriology, School of Medicine, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland 3: National Salmonella, Shigella, and Listeria Reference Laboratory, Clinical Science Institute, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland 4: Discipline of Anatomy, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland 5: Center for Health from Environment, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

Publication date: April 1, 2013

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