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Evaluation of Methods To Assess the Biofilm-Forming Ability of Listeria monocytogenes

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Abstract:

The contamination of ready-to-eat products with Listeria monocytogenes has been related to the presence of biofilms in production lines, as biofilms protect cells from chemical sanitizers. The ability of L. monocytogenes to produce biofilms is often evaluated using in vitro methodologies. This work aims to compare the most frequently used methodologies, including high-throughput screening methods based on microplates (crystal violet and the Calgary Biofilm Device) and methods based on CFU enumeration and microscopy after growth on stainless steel. Thirty isolates with diverse origins and genetic characteristics were evaluated. No (or low) correlations between methods were observed. The only significant correlation was found between the methods using stainless steel. No statistically significant correlation (P > 0.05) was detected among genetic lineage, serovar, and biofilm-forming ability. Because results indicate that biofilm formation is influenced by the surface material, the extrapolation of results from high-throughput methods using microplates to more industrially relevant surfaces should be undertaken with caution.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-464

Affiliations: 1: Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Food Science Building, Center for Food Safety, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA; Laboratório de Microbiologia, CBAA/DRAT, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal 2: Centro de Ecologia Aplicada “Prof. Baeta Neves” CEABN/INBIO, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal 3: Laboratório de Microbiologia, CBAA/DRAT, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal 4: Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Food Science Building, Center for Food Safety, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA., Email: cmsjoe@uga.edu

Publication date: August 1, 2012

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