Skip to main content

Influence of NaCl and NaNO3 on Sinigrin Hydrolysis by Foodborne Bacteria

The full text article is not available for purchase.

The publisher only permits individual articles to be downloaded by subscribers.

Abstract:

The glucosinolate sinigrin (SNG) is converted by endogenous plant myrosinase or by bacterial myrosinase-like activity to form the potent antimicrobial allyl isothiocyanate. In order to use SNG as a natural antimicrobial precursor in food, it became important to better understand the ability of bacteria to synthesize the enzyme(s) and understand factors influencing this synthesis at a constant SNG concentration. Eight spoilage, pathogenic, or starter culture bacteria were grown separately in medium containing individual or combined salts with SNG. SNG degradation by the bacteria and the formation of its major degradation product, allyl isothiocyanate, were followed for 12 days at 30 or 35°C. The bacterial strains varied in their ability to metabolize SNG, and this was enhanced by NaCl and/or NaNO3. SNG hydrolysis took place after 4 days, and the greatest amount occurred by day 12. At 12 days, Escherichia coli O157:H7 showed the greatest capacity to hydrolyze SNG (45.3% degradation), followed by Staphylococcus carnosus (44.57%), while Pseudomonas fluorescens was not active against SNG. The ability of tested strains to metabolize SNG, in decreasing order, was as follows: Escherichia coli O157:H7 > Staphylococcus carnosus > Staphylococcus aureus > Pediococcus pentosaceus > Salmonella Typhimurium > Listeria monocytogenes > Enterococcus faecalis > Pseudomonas fluorescens.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-284

Affiliations: 1: Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Mutah University, Karak, Jordan 2: Instituto Tecnológico del Embalaje, Transporte y Logística (ITENE), Parque Technologica, C/Albert Einstein, 1, 46980 Paterna, Valencia, Spain 3: Department of Food Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2

Publication date: 2011-12-01

More about this publication?
  • Access Key
  • Free ContentFree content
  • Partial Free ContentPartial Free content
  • New ContentNew content
  • Open Access ContentOpen access content
  • Partial Open Access ContentPartial Open access content
  • Subscribed ContentSubscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed ContentPartial Subscribed content
  • Free Trial ContentFree trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more