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Escherichia coli O157:H7 Populations in Ruminants Can Be Reduced by Orange Peel Product Feeding

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Abstract:

Foodborne pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 are threats to the safety of beef. Citrus peel and dried orange pulp are by-products from citrus juice production that have natural antimicrobial effects and are often incorporated into least-cost ration formulations for beef and dairy cattle. This study was designed to determine if orange peel and pulp affected E. coli O157:H7 populations in vivo. Sheep (n = 24) were fed a cracked corn grain–based diet that was supplemented with a 50-50 mixture of dried orange pellet and fresh orange peel to achieve a final concentration (dry matter basis, wt/wt) of 0, 5, or 10% pelleted orange peel (OP) for 10 days. Sheep were artificially inoculated with 1010 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 by oral dosing. Fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 was measured daily for 5 days after inoculation, after which all animals were humanely euthanized. At 96 h postinoculation, E. coli O157:H7 shedding was reduced (P < 0.05) in sheep fed 10% OP. Populations of inoculated E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by OP treatment throughout the gastrointestinal tract; however, this reduction reached significant levels in the rumen (P < 0.05) of sheep fed 10% OP diets. Cecal and rectal populations of E. coli O157:H7 were reduced (P < 0.05) by inclusion of both 5 and 10% OP diets. Our results demonstrate that orange peel products can be used as a preharvest intervention strategy as part of an integrated pathogen reduction scheme.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-234

Affiliations: 1: Food and Feed Safety Research Unit, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, Texas 77845, USA. todd.callaway@ars.usda.gov 2: Livestock Issues Research Unit, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Lubbock, Texas 79403, USA 3: University of Florida Range Cattle Research and Education Center, Ona, Florida 33865, USA 4: Food and Feed Safety Research Unit, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, Texas 77845, USA 5: National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Centennial, Colorado 80112, USA 6: Center for Food Safety and Food Science Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72704, USA, USA 7: Center for Food Safety and Food Science Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72704, USA

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