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Microarray Analysis Reveals the Actual Specificity of Enrichment Media Used for Food Safety Assessment

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Abstract:

Microbial diagnostic microarrays are tools for simultaneous detection and identification of microorganisms in food, clinical, and environmental samples. In comparison to classic methods, microarray-based systems have the potential for high throughput, parallelism, and miniaturization. High specificity and high sensitivity of detection have been demonstrated. A microbial diagnostic microarray for the detection of the most relevant bacterial food- and waterborne pathogens and indicator organisms was developed and thoroughly validated. The microarray platform based on sequence-specific end labeling of oligonucleotides and the phylogenetically robust gyrB marker gene allowed a highly specific (resolution on genus and/or species level) and sensitive (0.1% relative and 104 CFU absolute sensitivity) detection of the target pathogens. In initial challenge studies of the applicability of microarray-based food analysis, we obtained results demonstrating the questionable specificity of standardized culture-dependent microbiological detection methods. Taking into consideration the importance of reliable food safety assessment methods, comprehensive performance assessment is essential. Results demonstrate the potential of this new pathogen diagnostic microarray to evaluate culture-based standard methods in microbiological food analysis.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-10-388

Affiliations: 1: AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf, Austria; Christian Doppler Laboratory for Molecular Food Analytics, Institute of Milk Hygiene, Milk Technology, and Food Science, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinärplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria. tanja.kostic@ait.ac.at 2: Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Science, Institute of Milk Hygiene, Milk Technology, and Food Science, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinärplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria 3: AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf, Austria

Publication date: 2011-06-01

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