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Distribution of Aminogenic Activity among Potential Autochthonous Starter Cultures for Dry Fermented Sausages

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Abstract:

Any bacterial strain to be used as starter culture should have suitable characteristics, including a lack of amino acid decarboxylase activity. In this study, the decarboxylase activity of 76 bacterial strains, including lactic acid bacteria and gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci, was investigated. These strains were previously isolated from European traditional fermented sausages to develop autochthonous starter cultures. Of all the strains tested, 48% of the lactic acid bacteria strains and 13% of gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci decarboxylated one or more amino acids. Aminogenic potential was strain dependent, although some species had a higher proportion of aminogenic strains than did others. Thus, all Lactobacillus curvatus strains and 70% of Lactobacillus brevis strains had the capacity to produce tyramine and β-phenylethylamine. Some strains also produced other aromatic amines, such as tryptamine and the diamines putrescine and cadaverine. All the enterococcal strains tested were decarboxylase positive, producing high amounts of tyramine and considerable amounts of b -phenylethylamine. None of the staphylococcal strains had tyrosine-decarboxylase activity, but some produced other amines. From the aminogenic point of view, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Staphylococcus xylosus strains would be the most suitable for use as autochthonous starter cultures for traditional fermented sausages.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Departament de Nutrició i Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Joan XXIII s/n, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain 2: Departament de Nutrició i Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Joan XXIII s/n, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain, Institute for Food and Agricultural Research and Technology, Finca Camps i Armet, E-17121 Monells, Spain 3: Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Centre de Recherches de Clermont-Ferrand-Theix, Microbiology Unit, 63 122 Saint-Genès Champanelle, France 4: Institute for Food and Agricultural Research and Technology, Finca Camps i Armet, E-17121 Monells, Spain 5: Dipartimento di Produzioni Animali, Biotecnologie Veterinarie, Qualità e Sicurezza degli Alimenti, Università degli Studi di Parma, Via del Taglio 8, 43100 Parma, Italy 6: Dipartimento di Scienze degli Alimenti, Università degli Studi di Teramo, Piazza Aldo Moro 45, 64100 Teramo, Italy 7: Facultade de Medicina Veterinária, Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal, Av. da Universidade Técnica, Polo Universitário, Alto da Ajuda, 1300-477 Lisboa, Portugal 8: Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, Str., Votanikos GR-118 55, Greece 9: Institute of Animal Physiology, Slovak Academy of Science, Ŝoltésovej 4-6, 04001 Koŝice, Slovakia 10: Departament de Nutrició i Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Joan XXIII s/n, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain; Email: mcvidal@ub.edu

Publication date: 2010-03-01

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