Taenia solium Metacestode Viability in Infected Pork after Preparation with Salt Pickling or Cooking Methods Common in Yucatán, México

$37.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

The cestode parasite Taenia solium is an important cause of foodborne infection throughout tropical and subtropical regions. Ingestion of pork meat infected with T. solium larvae can lead to taeniasis infection in humans. With tourism and the consumption of native food increasing, it is important to investigate potential risks of transmission associated with food preparation methods. In this study, traditional Mexican salt pickling and two methods of pork preparation (as roast pork [cochinita pibil] and in pork and beans [frijol con puerco]) were evaluated in order to determine their effects on T. solium cyst viability in infected tissue. In the control groups, all metacestodes isolated were 100% viable, and only small changes in pH (from 6.0 to 5.9) and temperature (29 to 30°C) were recorded. No viable cysts were detected after 12 and 24 h of salt pickling. The pH of the meat during salting dropped from 6.0 to 5.3. Osmotic changes and dehydration from the salting, rather than a change in pH, could be considered the main cause of cyst death. Temperatures of >65°C damaged T. solium metacestodes in roast pork and in pork and beans. The results of this study indicate that if traditional pork dishes are prepared properly, T. solium cysts are destroyed. The criteria used in this study to evaluate the viability of tissue cysts are discussed.

Keywords:

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Laboratorio de Inmunologia y Biologia Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN) Unidad Merida, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km 6, AP 73, CP 97310, Mérida, Yucatán, México 2: Laboratorios de Parasitologia e Inmunologia y Salud Pública Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán (FMVZ-UADY), AP 4-116, Colonia Itzimna, 97100 Mérida, Yucatán, México 3: Cestode Zoonoses Research Group, Division of Biological Sciences, School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK 4: Laboratorios de Parasitologia e Inmunologia y Salud Pública Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán (FMVZ-UADY), AP 4-116, Colonia Itzimna, 97100 Mérida, Yucatán, México

Publication date: April 1, 2002

More about this publication?
  • IAFP members must first sign in on the right to access full text articles of JFP

    First published in 1937, the Journal of Food Protection®, is a refereed monthly publication. Each issue contains scientific research and authoritative review articles reporting on a variety of topics in food science pertaining to food safety and quality. The Journal is internationally recognized as the leading publication in the field of food microbiology with a readership exceeding 11,000 scientists from 70 countries. The Journal of Food Protection® is indexed in Index Medicus, Current Contents, BIOSIS, PubMed, Medline, and many others.

    Print and online subscriptions are available to Members and Institutional subscribers. Online visitors who are not IAFP Members or journal subscribers will be charged on a pay-per-view basis. Information can be obtained by calling +1 800.369.6337; +1 515.276.3344; fax: +1 515.276.8655, E-mail: info@foodprotection.org or Web site: www.foodprotection.org
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Membership Information
  • Information for Advertisers
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more