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Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonellae Isolated from Market-Age Swine

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Abstract:

Antimicrobial resistance levels were examined for 365 Salmonella isolates recovered from the lymph nodes (n = 224) and cecal contents (n = 141) of market-age swine at slaughter. Antimicrobial resistance testing was performed by disk diffusion using 13 antibiotics common in the treatment of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Although none of the antibiotics tested were used subtherapeutically within the last 5 years on the farms sampled, resistance to chlortetracycline, penicillin G, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole was common. Penicillin G resistance was significantly more frequent (P = 0.03) and sulfisoxazole resistance was significantly less frequent (P < 0.01) in lymph node versus cecal isolates. Multidrug resistance was observed among 94.7% of the lymph node isolates and 93.5% of the cecal isolates. The most frequent multidrug resistance pattern included three antibiotics—penicillin G, streptomycin, and chlortetracycline. Isolates in somatic serogroup B, and more specifically, Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Schwarzengrund isolates, were often resistant to a greater number of antibiotics than were isolates in the other serogroups. Streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, ampicillin (lymph node isolates), and nitrofurantoin (cecal isolates) resistance levels differed significantly between somatic serogroups. The prevalence of penicillin G-, streptomycin-, and sulfisoxazole-resistant isolates differed significantly between serovars for both lymph node and cecal isolates. Results of this study suggest that a correlation exists between the somatic serogroup or serovar of a Salmonella isolate and its antimicrobial resistance status, which is specific to the antibiotic of interest and the source of the isolate (lymph node versus cecal contents).

Keywords:

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 2: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, College Station, Texas 77845, USA 3: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, College Station, Texas 77845, USA 4: Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA

Publication date: 2001-10-01

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