Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Micrococcus luteus by Linear Furanocoumarins in a Model Food System

Authors: Ulate-Rodríguez, Jorge1; Schafer, H. William2; Zottola, Edmund A.2; Davidson, P. Michael3

Source: Journal of Food Protection®, Number 9, September 1997, pp. 1019-1151 , pp. 1050-1054(5)

Publisher: International Association for Food Protection

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Abstract:

Lime peel, parsnip, lemon peel, dried parsley flakes, cold-pressed lime oil, and distilled lime oil samples were analyzed for the presence and concentration of the linear furanocoumarins (LFs) psoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP), and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Cold-pressed lime oil had the highest LF content (psoralen, 67 ± 29 μg/ml, 5-MOP, 1,634 ± 62 μg/ml, and 8-MOP, 44 ± 2 μg/ml). The antimicrobial effectiveness of LFs against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Micrococcus luteus was tested in a model food system consisting of a slurry of 25% commercial "garden vegetables" baby food in 0.1% peptone water. Inhibition required UV activation after the addition of the LFs to the model system. Lime peel extract, cold-pressed lime oil, and a 5-MOP standard inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes, but not E. coli O157:H7. M. luteus was inhibited only by the cold-pressed lime oil. The minimum LF concentration that caused inhibition of the growth of L. monocytogenes was 32 μg/g and the minimum bactericidal concentration was 43 μg/g. Cold-pressed lime oil inhibited L. monocytogenes even at the lowest concentration added to the model system (10 μg/g), while the corresponding LF standard did not. This suggested the presence of other antimicrobial agents in the oil.

Keywords: ESCHERICHIA; FURANOCOUMARINS; INHIBITION; LISTERIA; MICROCOCCUS; MODEL FOOD SYSTEM; PSORALEN

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA; General Mills, Inc., James Ford Bell Technical Center, 9000 Plymouth Avenue North, Minneapolis, MN 55427, USA 2: Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA 3: Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA; Department of Food Science and Toxicology, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA

Publication date: September 1, 1997

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    First published in 1937, the Journal of Food Protection®, is a refereed monthly publication. Each issue contains scientific research and authoritative review articles reporting on a variety of topics in food science pertaining to food safety and quality. The Journal is internationally recognized as the leading publication in the field of food microbiology with a readership exceeding 11,000 scientists from 70 countries. The Journal of Food Protection® is indexed in Index Medicus, Current Contents, BIOSIS, PubMed, Medline, and many others.

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