Decontamination of Plastic and Wooden Cutting Boards for Kitchen Use

Authors: Ak, Nese O.1; Cliver, Dean O.2; Kaspari, Charles W.3

Source: Journal of Food Protection®, Number 1, January 1994, pp. 4-86 , pp. 23-30(8)

Publisher: International Association for Food Protection

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Abstract:

Decontamination of plastic and wooden cutting boards was studied, with a view to preventing cross-contamination of foods in home kitchens. New and used plastic (four polymers plus hard rubber) and wood (nine hardwoods) boards were cut into 5-cm square blocks (25 cm2 area) for these experiments. Bacterial contaminants--Escherichia coli (two nonpathogenic strains plus serotype O157:H7), Listeria innocua, L, monocytogenes, or Salmonella typhimurium--applied to the block surface in nutrient broth or chicken juice, were recovered by soaking the surface in nutrient broth or pressing the block onto nutrient agar, within minutes or ≥12 h later. Persistence and overnight multiplication of bacteria on plastic surfaces depended on maintenance of humidity so as to prevent drying of the contaminant. New plastic cutting surfaces were relatively easy to clean and were microbiologically neutral, but plastic boards with extensive knife scars were difficult to clean manually, especially if they had deposits of chicken fat on them. Fewer bacteria were generally recovered from wooden blocks than from plastic blocks. Clean wood blocks rapidly absorbed all of the inoculum, after which the bacteria could not be recovered within 3 to 10 min. If the board surface was coated with chicken fat, some bacteria might be recovered even after 12 h at room temperature and high humidity. Cleaning with hot water and detergent generally removed these bacteria, regardless of bacterial species, wood species, and whether the wood was new or used.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Food Research Institute (Department of Food Microbiology and Toxicology), World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Food Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706; Department of Food Science, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Food Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 2: Food Research Institute (Department of Food Microbiology and Toxicology), World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Food Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706; Department of Bacteriology, Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Food Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 3: Food Research Institute (Department of Food Microbiology and Toxicology), World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Food Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

Publication date: January 1, 1994

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    First published in 1937, the Journal of Food Protection®, is a refereed monthly publication. Each issue contains scientific research and authoritative review articles reporting on a variety of topics in food science pertaining to food safety and quality. The Journal is internationally recognized as the leading publication in the field of food microbiology with a readership exceeding 11,000 scientists from 70 countries. The Journal of Food Protection® is indexed in Index Medicus, Current Contents, BIOSIS, PubMed, Medline, and many others.

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