Adherence of Ovarian Cancer Cells Induces Pleural Mesothelial Cell (PMC) Permeability

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Abstract:

Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) carries a grave prognosis with median survival after diagnosis being 5 months. The major causes of MPE are lung, breast, ovary, and gastric cancer. It is still unclear how cancer cells penetrate the pleural mesothelial monolayer and reach the pleural space. In this study we examined the effect of ovarian epithelial cancer cells on a confluent pleural mesothelial cell (PMC) monolayer. We demonstrate that ovarian cancer cells adhere to the mesothelial monolayer in a time-dependent manner and induce PMC barrier dysfunction as evidenced by a drop in electrical resistance on electrical cell substrate impedance-sensing system (ECIS) and increased protein permeability. Barrier dysfunction is attenuated by addition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody. Significant release of VEGF was noted when ovarian cancer cells were cocultured with PMC. Electron microscopy demonstrated gap formation in PMC monolayer only at the site of cancer cell attachment with surrounding areas remaining confluent.

Keywords: Key words: Ovarian cancer cells; Mesothelial cells

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096504002108748114

Affiliations: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202

Publication date: January 1, 2002

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  • Formerly: Oncology Research Incorporating Anti-Cancer Drug Design
    Oncology Research Featuring Preclinical and Clincal Cancer Therapeutics publishes research of the highest quality that contributes to an understanding of cancer in areas of molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, biophysics, genetics, biology, endocrinology, and immunology, as well as studies on the mechanism of action of carcinogens and therapeutic agents, reports dealing with cancer prevention and epidemiology, and clinical trials delineating effective new therapeutic regimens.
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