Open Access Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Severe and Refractory Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: 4 Years of Experience

 Download
(HTML 62.3 kb)
 
or
 Download
(PDF 408.3 kb)
 
Download Article:

Abstract:

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotential nonhematopoietic progenitors and are capable of differentiating into several tissues of mesenchymal origin. We have shown that bone marrow-derived MSCs from both SLE patients and lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice are defective structurally and functionally. Here we observe the long-term safety and efficacy of allogeneic MSC transplantation (MSCT) in treatment-resistant SLE patients. Eighty-seven patients with persistently active SLE who were refractory to standard treatment or had life-threatening visceral involvement were enrolled. Allogeneic bone marrow or umbilical cord-derived MSCs were harvested and infused intravenously (1 × 106 cells/kg of body weight). Primary outcomes were rates of survival, disease remission and relapse, as well as transplantation-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and serologic features. During the 4-year follow-up and with a mean follow-up period of 27 months, the overall rate of survival was 94% (82/87). Complete clinical remission rate was 28% at 1 year (23/83), 31% at 2 years (12/39), 42% at 3 years (5/12), and 50% at 4 years (3/6). Rates of relapse were 12% (10/83) at 1 year, 18% (7/39) at 2 years, 17% (2/12) at 3 years, and 17% (1/6) at 4 years. The overall rate of relapse was 23% (20/87). Disease activity declined as revealed by significant changes in the SLEDAI score, levels of serum autoantibodies, albumin, and complements. A total of five patients (6%) died after MSCT from non-treatment-related events in the 4-year follow-up, and no transplantation-related adverse event was observed. Allogeneic MSCT resulted in the induction of clinical remission and improvement in organ dysfunction in drug-resistant SLE patients.

Keywords: Clinical remission; Lupus erythematosus; Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); Transplantation

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368911X582769

Publication date: December 23, 2013

More about this publication?
  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more