If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Open Access Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

 Download
(HTML 92.5kb)
 
or
 Download
(PDF 980.4kb)
 
Download Article:

Abstract:

Recent advances in stem cell research have shown the promising nature of mesenchymal stem cells as plausible candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Many studies reported the use of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), which possess self-renewal capacity, high proliferation potential, and the ability to undergo multilineage differentiation. Together with this therapeutic approach, development of effective, noninvasive and nontoxic imaging techniques for visualizing and tracking the cells in vivo is crucial for the evaluation and improvement of stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful diagnostic imaging techniques currently available for in vivo diagnosis and has been proposed as the most attractive modality for monitoring stem cell migration. The aim of this study was to investigate the labeling efficiency of hDPSCs using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles in order to allow visualization using in vitro and in vivo MRI without influencing cellular metabolism. MRI and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed optimal uptake with low SPIO concentrations of 15 µg/ml in combination with 0.75 µg/ml poly-L-lysine (PLL) resulting in more than 13 pg iron/cell and an in vitro detection limit of 50 labeled cells/µl. Very low SPIO concentrations in the culture medium resulted in extremely high labeling efficiency not reported before. For these conditions, tetrazolium salt assays showed no adverse effects on cell viability. Furthermore, in vivo MRI was performed to detect labeled hDPSCs transplanted into the brain of Rag 2-γ C immune-deficient mice. Transplanted cells did not show any signs of tumorgenecity or teratoma formation during the studied time course. We have reported on a labeling and imaging strategy to visualize human dental pulp stem cells in vivo using MRI. These data provide a solid base to allow cell tracking in future regenerative studies in the brain longitudinally.
More about this publication?
  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more