Open Access Insulin-Producing Cells From Adult Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Control Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Nude Mice

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Abstract:

Harvesting, expansion, and directed differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) could provide an autologous source of surrogate β-cells that would alleviate the limitations of availability and/or allogenic rejection following pancreatic or islet transplantation. Bone marrow cells were obtained from three adult type 2 diabetic volunteers and three nondiabetic donors. After 3 days in culture, adherent MSCs were expanded for two passages. At passage 3, differentiation was carried out in a three-staged procedure. Cells were cultured in a glucose-rich medium containing several activation and growth factors. Cells were evaluated in vitro by flow cytometry, immunolabeling, RT-PCR, and human insulin and c-peptide release in responses to increasing glucose concentrations. One thousand cell clusters were inserted under the renal capsule of diabetic nude mice followed by monitoring of their diabetic status. At the end of differentiation, ∼5‐10% of cells were immunofluorescent for insulin, c-peptide or glucagon; insulin, and c-peptide were coexpressed. Nanogold immunolabeling for electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of c-peptide in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) expressed transcription factors and genes of pancreatic hormones similar to those expressed by pancreatic islets. There was a stepwise increase in human insulin and c-peptide release by IPCs in response to increasing glucose concentrations. Transplantation of IPCs into nude diabetic mice resulted in control of their diabetic status for 3 months. The sera of IPC-transplanted mice contained human insulin and c-peptide but negligible levels of mouse insulin. When the IPC-bearing kidneys were removed, rapid return of diabetic state was noted. BM-MSCs from diabetic and nondiabetic human subjects could be differentiated without genetic manipulation to form IPCs that, when transplanted, could maintain euglycemia in diabetic mice for 3 months. Optimization of the culture conditions are required to improve the yield of IPCs and their functional performance.

Keywords: Diabetes; Differentiation insulin; Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); Soluble factors

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X647162

Affiliations: Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura, Egypt

Publication date: January 1, 2013

More about this publication?
  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.

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