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Open Access Targeted Disruption of Outer Limiting Membrane Junctional Proteins (Crb1 and ZO-1) Increases Integration of Transplanted Photoreceptor Precursors Into the Adult Wild-Type and Degenerating Retina

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Abstract:

Diseases culminating in photoreceptor loss are a major cause of untreatable blindness. Transplantation of rod photoreceptors is feasible, provided donor cells are at an appropriate stage of development when transplanted. Nevertheless, the proportion of cells that integrate into the recipient outer nuclear layer (ONL) is low. The outer limiting membrane (OLM), formed by adherens junctions between Müller glia and photoreceptors, may impede transplanted cells from migrating into the recipient ONL. Adaptor proteins such as Crumbs homologue 1 (Crb1) and zona occludins (ZO-1) are essential for localization of the OLM adherens junctions. We investigated whether targeted disruption of these proteins enhances donor cell integration. Transplantation of rod precursors in wild-type mice achieved 949 ± 141 integrated cells. By contrast, integration is significantly higher when rod precursors are transplanted into Crb1rd8/rd8 mice, a model of retinitis pigmentosa and Lebers congenital amaurosis that lacks functional CRB1 protein and displays disruption of the OLM (7,819 ± 1,297; maximum 15,721 cells). We next used small interfering (si)RNA to transiently reduce the expression of ZO-1 and generate a reversible disruption of the OLM. ZO-1 knockdown resulted in similar, significantly improved, integration of transplanted cells in wild-type mice (7,037 ± 1,293; maximum 11,965 cells). Finally, as the OLM remains largely intact in many retinal disorders, we tested whether transient ZO-1 knockdown increased integration in a model of retinitis pigmentosa, the rho−/− mouse; donor cell integration was significantly increased from 313 ± 58 cells without treatment to 919 ± 198 cells after ZO-1 knockdown. This study shows that targeted disruption of OLM junctional proteins enhances integration in the wild-type and degenerating retina and may be a useful approach for developing photoreceptor transplantation strategies.

Keywords: Degeneration; Migration; Müller glia; Stem cell; Transplantation

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/096368909X486057

Affiliations: Department of Genetics, University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK. rachael.pearson@ucl.ac.uk

Publication date: 2010-04-01

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  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.
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