Skip to main content

Open Access Percutaneous Cell Delivery Into the Heart Using Hydrogels Polymerizing In Situ

Download Article:
 Download
(HTML 40.3 kb)
 
or
 Download
(PDF 849.6 kb)
 

Abstract:

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US. Following an acute myocardial infarction, a fibrous, noncontractile scar develops, and results in congestive heart failure in more than 500,000 patients in the US each year. Muscle regeneration and the induction of new vascular growth to treat ischemic disorders of the heart can have significant therapeutic implications. Early studies in patients with chronic ischemic systolic left ventricular dysfunction (SLVD) using skeletal myoblasts or bone marrow-derived cells report improvement in left ventricular ejection function (LVEF) and clinical status, without notable safety issues. Nonetheless, the efficacy of cell transfer for cardiovascular disease is not established, in part due to a lack of control over cell retention, survival, and function following delivery. We studied the use of biocompatible hydrogels polymerizable in situ as a cell delivery vehicle, to improve cell retention, survival, and function following delivery into the ischemic myocardium. The study was conducted using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and fibrin glue, but the methods are applicable to any human stem cells (adult or embryonic) and a wide range of hydrogels. We first evaluated the utility of several commercially available percutaneous catheters for delivery of viscous cell/hydrogel suspensions. Next we characterized the polymerization kinetics of fibrin glue solutions to define the ranges of concentrations compatible with catheter delivery. We then demonstrate the in vivo effectiveness of this preparation and its ability to increase cell retention and survival in a nude rat model of myocardial infarction.

Keywords: Heart repair; Human stem cells; Hydrogel

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368909788534915

Affiliations: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. tpm2102@columbia.edu

Publication date: March 1, 2009

More about this publication?
  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.
cog/ct/2009/00000018/00000003/art00007
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more