Central Necrosis in Isolated Hypoxic Human Pancreatic Islets: Evidence for Postisolation Ischemia

$79.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

A variety of explanations have been provided to elucidate the requirement of the large islet mass that is essential for a successful treatment of patients with type I diabetes by intrahepatic transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate islet cell survival under the effect of prolonged hypoxia and/or nutrient withdrawal, which mimics posttransplantation environment of transplanted islets in the liver. We studied the influence of 24 h of hypoxia (1% O2) in intact isolated human and rat islets as well as the effect of combined oxygen/nutrient deprivation in a mouse insulinoma cell line (MIN6). In intact human islets, 24 h of hypoxia led to central necrosis combined with apoptotic features such as nuclear pyknosis and DNA fragmentation. In the course of hypoxic treatment, ultrastructural analysis demonstrated a gradual transition from an apoptotic to a necrotic morphology particularly pronounced in central areas of large islets. In MIN6 cells, on the other hand, hypoxia led to a twofold (p < 0.01) increase in caspase-3 activity, an indicator of apoptosis, but not to necrosis, as determined by release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Only in combination with nutrient/serum deprivation was a marked increase in LDH release observed (sixfold vs. control, p < 0.01). We therefore conclude that, similar to MIN6 cells, central necrosis in isolated hypoxic islets is the result of the combined effects of hypoxia and nutrient/serum deprivation, most likely due to limited diffusion. Provided that transplanted islets undergo a similar fate as shown in our in vitro study, future emphasis will require the development of strategies that protect the islet graft from early cell death and accelerate the revascularization process.

Keywords: Apoptosis; Hypoxia; Ischemia; Islet transplantation

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/000000005783983287

Affiliations: 1: Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland, 2: Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland 3: Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland, Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland 4: Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland 5: Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland 6: Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland

Publication date: January 1, 2005

More about this publication?
  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more